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Geodesic dome covering  RSS feed

 
Jason Nicoll
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I have some friends with a 6m high, metal framed geodesic dome that needs covering. I am interested in any permaculture views of the choice of materials, especially relating to sustainability, low embedded energy, durability, and cost.

The plan is to use the space as a workshop/tool shed, but it might be best left as a greenhouse.

Thanks

 
John Elliott
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Cob is a cheap, durable, sustainable building material for the walls, if you were to use the edges of the geodesic for anchoring your laths to spread the cob.

As far as a roof material, if you want to keep light coming in and rely mostly on natural lighting, polycarbonate sheeting is commonly used for skylights and greenhouses. It's not cheap though, but it's pretty durable and as far as sustainability, it can be recycled when its useful life is over.
 
R Scott
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Trying to figure out a good covering stopped me from building a dome. I figured ferrocement was about the best for minimal waste. Everything else is made in rectangles and needs expensive stuff to waterproof the seams.
 
John Adamz
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Location: Springfield, mo
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I used 6mil marine shrink wrap to cover my 22ft 3v 4/9 dome IIRC at a cost of about $60. Got enough to do it 2x since it will only last 2-3 years.
I chose white, but you can get clear as well.
Using a RMH to heat the Aquaponics inside.
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Yet to be shrunk dome cover
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Van Taylor
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any pics after it was shrunk?
 
John Adamz
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Location: Springfield, mo
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Van Taylor wrote:any pics after it was shrunk?

Well surprisingly I couldn't find any so I took a few. I had to pleat the bottom few feet about every 5 or so feet. There was just way too much to shrink up without doing so.
The $60 price I stated before was for the 1 time. The 120x17ft roll was $138.
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Van Taylor
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Looks great, how is it working out with all this cold weather we are having? I am accumulating materials right now for my own which I hope to have finished by the end of Febuary so I can get an early start this year. I would love to see some pics of the inside and some data on temps in and out. Thanks Van
 
Kevin EarthSoul
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Jason Nicoll wrote:I have some friends with a 6m high, metal framed geodesic dome that needs covering. I am interested in any permaculture views of the choice of materials, especially relating to sustainability, low embedded energy, durability, and cost.

The plan is to use the space as a workshop/tool shed, but it might be best left as a greenhouse.

Thanks



I would explore adding lathing between the struts as a support framework (wattle) and then cobbing (daub). The main problem thereafter would be water-proofing. Perhaps a lime plaster? I recently found a product called "Izonil" that claims to be "environmentally friendly". I suspect it's a proprietary lime-based mix.

Kevin
 
Shannyn Gump
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Location: Red Hill, New Mexico
chicken rabbit solar
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I see its been three years, kevin how is the cover holding up? I have a 30ft dome that is on its third cover and i need something better for number four.
 
Robert Jack
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How about yurt canvas and a skylight using PVC not very cheap but makes for a beautiful space
dome-covered.jpg
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Peter VanDerWal
Posts: 77
Location: Southern Arizona
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bee bike fish
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Robert Jack wrote:How about yurt canvas and a skylight using PVC not very cheap but makes for a beautiful space


Hmm, I'm betting that canvas is probably the most sustainable and environmentally friendly choice.  Creating plastic generally requires a lot of energy and results in a lot of toxic waste products.

Glass requires a tremendous amount of energy, but it can last for hundreds of years (as apposed to less than 10 for clear plastics, less than 2 for some).  For letting light in, you an't beat glass in the long run, at least not with modern technology.
 
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