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bradford pear id and discussion  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 1974
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
60
forest garden trees urban
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Found this at the edge of a parking lot in northern Kentucky. Zone 6a I believe.

Seemed like a pear maybe. ..
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William Bronson
pollinator
Posts: 1974
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
60
forest garden trees urban
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One more of the fruit, they felt a little fuzzy. ..
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Posts: 1750
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
42
forest garden solar
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Both the leaves and the fruit screams pear 101%
 
steward
Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
104
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Are they very small fruits ? If they are an inch or so in size , they are probably Bradford pears. Ornamental type.
 
William Bronson
pollinator
Posts: 1974
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
60
forest garden trees urban
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Yes, very small fruit.Bradford huh?
Can it be eaten?
Or made into peary?
Thank you both for the id!
I work as a service plumber, and as I drive around I have been taking note of what I suspect to be untended fruit and nut trees.
I mark them in my gps and take photos. Not sure I will ever do anything with them, but it can't hurt right?
 
gardener
Posts: 721
Location: south central VA 7B
94
bee books forest garden fungi solar trees
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It's said they are delicious. Lots of fruit on that tree - that's unusual.
 
wayne stephen
steward
Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
104
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Generally people do not eat them . This tree was cultivated for fast leaf and branch growth over fruit quality. They grow very fast and frequently break limbs in high winds. Which in Kentucky is often . Give them a try this fall and get back to us . I planted 6 more palatable pears and they grow just as fast .
 
Marianne Cicala
gardener
Posts: 721
Location: south central VA 7B
94
bee books forest garden fungi solar trees
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Agreed Wayne - we won't even offer them for sale at the nursery as an ornamental as they will split and wind will snaps limbs. Really a lousy tree!
 
William Bronson
pollinator
Posts: 1974
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
60
forest garden trees urban
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This one is almost certainly wild, I have read that the improved varieties cross breed and make for invasive off spring. This "hybrid vigor" probably explains the abundence of fruit.
 
William Bronson
pollinator
Posts: 1974
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
60
forest garden trees urban
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Btw I have a Bartlett, bought on a whim, didn't know they really need a pollinator.
Any recomendations?
It needs to be small...
 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
89
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I have a seckel double-grafted with a buerre bosc on quince rootstock,
Seckel is a natural semi-dwarf, but be warned: a pear's idea of 'semi-dwarf' might still be pretty big...
If you're comfortable with grafted trees, any pear grafted on quince should stay reasonably small.
 
William Bronson
pollinator
Posts: 1974
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
60
forest garden trees urban
 
gardener
Posts: 357
Location: Beaver County, Pennsylvania (~ zone 6)
9
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They're much better after a frost and fermented on the tree a bit... like little pear berries.
 
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