• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Electric Snow blower  RSS feed

 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3430
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
208
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We got lots of snow overnight and it took me over an hour to clear the driveway. It was Sunday so I had a bit more time to spend shuffling, but over an hour job on a weekday would just not be easy to fit in my schedule. So, I am thinking of getting a snow blower to speed up the process. I don't like the idea of having to deal with a gasoline engine, but found out that there are electric snow blowers.

Did anybody try one of those?
 
allen lumley
pollinator
Posts: 4154
Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
58
books fungi hugelkultur solar wofati woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes used them, sold them out of the families hardware store, Generally if a company makes a gas and an electric most of the Blower parts are interchangeable,
and the electric is a little lighter, The technology has not really evolved to be able to go cordless, so you have to create a unique snow clearing pattern to
guarantee you are not going to run over the cord!

It is generally more of a hastle when yur snow blower eats the cord but it can be a major pain in the Ass ! Hope this helps Big AL !
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3430
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
208
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My only worry is that it would not work well in wet snow. The previous snow fall we had was very wet, this one was powdery, so I am not sure which is the most common here.
 
John Gratrick
Posts: 55
Location: Mallorytown Zone 5a
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The smaller electric ones are usually referred to as snow shovels and only work well in the light stuff we just got. Once it melts/packs down the smaller electric ones don't have enough power to really move the snow to where you want it to go. I sell these at one of my jobs and they work for the small walkways but not for a big driveway and Big Al is right, they are corded, and as for someone who drives over their electric lawnmower extension more often that I'd like, keeping track of that in the snow would be a pain, unless you had a cord spotter.
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3430
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
208
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Any brand recommendations for a bigger electric one?
 
John Gratrick
Posts: 55
Location: Mallorytown Zone 5a
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm a big fan of the Toro line as they back their product up really well with their warranty programs. I also think that Ariens puts out a decent sized one but I don't know how available it is in Canada. For that you'd probably have to go through a dealer, like Canadian Small Engines. Just aim for higher amps, I think 15 amps is as high as I've seen but haven't searched that extensively.
 
allen lumley
pollinator
Posts: 4154
Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
58
books fungi hugelkultur solar wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I Agree! Big Al !
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3430
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
208
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks to both of you for the information.

It looks like some of them are plastic and people are complaining about this.
 
Brian Hamalainen
Posts: 100
Location: Chimacum, WA Sunset Zone 5, USDA Zone 8B
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
John Gratrick wrote:Just aim for higher amps, I think 15 amps is as high as I've seen but haven't searched that extensively.
99% of North American home power outlets, not counting the big 220V plugs from driers and electric stoves, are going to be 120v/15A. A metal shop would probably have some 120V/20A outlets, but otherwise a 120V/20A cable/plug is only used to go between a generator and a house power panel.
 
Tom Gauthier
Posts: 57
Location: U.P., Michigan
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As Brian pointed out, an electric snowblower will be limited to 15A, which means a maximum of about 2hp. A medium duty gas snowblower will have about 5-6hp. You'll never get there with an electric. Better off to invest your money in a couple good snow shovels.
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3430
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
208
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for the information Tom. I think we are starting to work a system with the shuffles.
 
John Gratrick
Posts: 55
Location: Mallorytown Zone 5a
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You could throw a few bucks to the kids in the area to see if they want to shovel for you. Would be good for them. (If you can get them off their phones long enough.)
 
Destiny's powerful hand has made the bed of my future. And this tiny ad:
Jacqueline Freeman - Honeybee Techniques - streaming video
https://permies.com/wiki/65175/videos/digital-market/Jacqueline-Freeman-Honeybee-Techniques-streaming
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!