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living fence

 
Posts: 14
Location: Athens, Ga moving to Little River, SC soon
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Has anyone any experience with building with living material? Can weeping willow be used to
make living fence or is it to much to try and maintain. I have some in my greenhouse rooting
for this purpose but in my readings I cant seem to find any use of weeping type for building.
Thanks
 
Posts: 2679
Location: Phoenix, AZ (9b)
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Hi Chris:

I have no experience with this but I did just read an article on a use for live willows here: http://permaculturenews.org/2014/01/25/tunneling-school/

This group builds living tunnels for schools out of willows.





 
Posts: 319
Location: (Zone 7-8/Elv. 350) Powhatan, VA (Sloped Forests & Meadow)
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I would think you could build the bones of one with willow and under plant with a thorn shrub. What is will keep in / out is the bigger question. If it is more of a human barrier you will be fine. I would do a two row close stagger and weave across one skip (vs how the tunnel is).
 
chris spaugh
Posts: 14
Location: Athens, Ga moving to Little River, SC soon
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Thanks for the responses, I am going to go ahead and try it. I like the living structure, it has quite a nice appeal to me.
If it takes more work so be it. I am not trying to keep anything caged in or out.
 
Posts: 225
Location: S.E. Michigan - Zone 6a
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Osage Orange is reported to make an excellent living fence. It is reported to be “horse high, bull strong and pig tight". I haven't done this yet but plan on it.
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Weeping willow is one of the finest shade trees, once mature.
However, they are massive, unlike the willows used to weave fences.

They grow well with moist soil.
They are common along creeks and ponds, but scarce (and scrawny) in drier soils.

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pollinator
Posts: 3738
Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
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I don't think you want the weeping type for a fence. Here's a great page that list varieties for various purposes. I bought 2 Matsunda types for fodder for my livestock this year and they are off to a great start
 
chris spaugh
Posts: 14
Location: Athens, Ga moving to Little River, SC soon
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Thanks CJ
 
Mother Tree
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Location: Portugal
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Here's a very nice illustration of building a living fence, taken from this site - Building a Living Fence

 
Been there. Done that. Went back for more. But this time, I took this tiny ad with me:
A rocket mass heater is the most sustainable way to heat a conventional home
http://woodheat.net
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