• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • James Freyr
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
  • Dave Burton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Steve Thorn
  • Eric Hanson

do any mushrooms grow well on mulberry or hackberry logs? What size logs?

 
Posts: 61
Location: southeast SD (zone 4b/5a)
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just knocked down a bunch of small trees. Ive read that 8 in. diameter is the max size for fruiting on logs but whats the minimum size?
 
Posts: 57
Location: Austria, Central Europe, USDA-Zone 6b
23
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Al Senner wrote:Ive read that 8 in. diameter is the max size for fruiting on logs but whats the minimum size?




Where did you read that??? I personally wouldn't bother to inoculate logs of less than 20 cm (8in) diameter. Only oak inoculated with shiitake works well with smaller diameters. I've had success with oyster mushrooms on hazel and beech with only 4-5in, but the yield wasn't worth the effort.
Usually I use maple and beech from 10-20in
 
Al Senner
Posts: 61
Location: southeast SD (zone 4b/5a)
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Where did you read that



fungi perfecti's catalog
 
Posts: 1502
Location: Chihuahua Desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
oysters will likely grow on that wood, and if it's chipped, King Stropharia would probably do well, also.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2346
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
202
books composting toilet bee rocket stoves wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've seen monstrously big crops of oysters growing on fallen beech trees around here. I think one fallen tree had over 100kg of fruiting bodies on it. That one had a trunk over 3ft thick. You can definitely get useful crops from large diameter wood.

The three things I can think of that might come in to play are:

Ease of handling - smaller diameter pieces are easier to work with so might make commercial work more efficient.

Smaller diameter logs have a different ratio of heartwood to outer new wood - the outerwood contains more readily available sugars so is more rapidly consumed by the fungi. Smaller diameter wood might therefore be more productive than lareg diameter, but that would by no means mean discarding larger diameter material.

Larger diameter material might have more value put to other uses (firewood, planking etc...)
 
gardener
Posts: 2736
194
forest garden fungi trees books food preservation bike
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Although Michael's other reasons are good too, the main reason I've seen from professionsals is reason number two: because the ration of new wood to heartwood is better, so there are more sugars upon which the mycelium can grow.  Yes, I've typically seen 4 to 8 inches as optimal, but if it's your own lot, and you're cutting your own wood for free, that changes the financial and logistic dynamics.
John S
PDX OR
 
The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers: http://richsoil.com/cards
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!