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Allotment  RSS feed

 
gardener
Posts: 1369
Location: Cascades of Oregon
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Would making allotments available on ones farm be a viable income?
Do you think that making small allotments available on your property would be a benefit?
If you had a large parcel and were unable to utilize the entire portion allowing allotments use  through sweat equity or actual rental could help develop or bring unused land into production. A monetary reward shouldn't be the only consideration.
Establishing parameters of what is allowed on each allotment could establish or develop space that you wouldn't be able to develop on your own at a faster rate. For example raised beds constructed of the same material and same size. Should an allotment once used by someone else is fallow or unused by them, it could be brought into production by the owner.
Through observation you might be able to enlist prolific gardeners  to assist and produce more produce for sale.
 
steward
Posts: 2524
Location: FL
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I've considered doing this.  The term I use is plot rental rather than allotment, but we are talking about the same thing.  There is plenty of information online how different garden rental operations work.  Look around, you can find what you are looking for, get some ideas.

Should I happen to go this route, I would be setting up 40'x40' sections, 2k sqft each.  I would be charging $25-50/month for use of the garden plot.  I would require organic inputs only, all natural methods.  If I can get 10 of these plots rented, it would be a nice shot in the arm.  Still don't have land yet.

Systems need to be set up to service the land and people.  A restroom facility and irrigation water supply being at the top of the list.  Drinking water is a big plus.  Someplace for the people to get out of the sun and sit down would be practical, say, a picnic table and a tarp cover at the very least.  A workstation where people can clean and process their haul.  Parking for several vehicles, higher volume would be expected on weekends.  Paths which allow people to drive up to their plot to deliver compost, mulch, materials.

Gotta set up some rules.  Establishing a perimeter of 2 feet around each plot may be needed to prevent/retard weed growth.  Do you shut off the water at night?  If someone neglects their plot for an extended period, do you mow it down?  Do you allow fences?  Do you allow storage sheds?  How will the kids be kept out of other peoples plots?  Them strawberries are mighty tempting.  Do you mow the perimeter or are the tenants responsible?  Do you have hose available or are they on their own? Do you allow decorations?

A sacrifice in such a system would be the loss of ability to raise pure seed.  Too much opportunity for cross pollination.

Plenty of opportunity with such an endeavor.

How about setting up several tables to allow your tenants to sell their product, in effect a farmers market every weekend or even daily.  If they can pay for their plot with some sales, it will keep them around longer putting cash in your pocket.

How about renting a rototiller?  Steel toed boots would be required.  I would be inclined to till it once/year as part of the rental/service agreement.

Sell them the inputs.  Bring in a big pile of compost, sell it off for a buck a bucket or by the sackful.  Sell stakes, string, soda, snacks, seed, transplants, hand tools, buckets, containers, what have you.

Set up some sheds with doors and locks, let them out for a few bucks extra added to the rent.

I think it would be fun to have a pot luck with the tenants.  Everyone show up with something made with what they grew, throw some burgers or chicken, maybe some steaks on a grill, get some fellowship going.

 
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It seems like it could be one income stream.  And it could be a really good income stream.

 
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