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I would like to establish a patch of clover, but I cannot fid out how much seed to use!  RSS feed

 
Terri Matthews
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Location: Eastern Kansas
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My goal is to establish clover to suppress weeds, and to plant corn in the clover. I figure that the corn will be tall enough to get enough sun while the clover will cover the ground well enough to shade out any infant weeds.

I figure that after the corn has been harvested, that I can just mow the clover like the rest of the lawn. Then, next year, I can again plant corn or other tall vegetables in the clover. At no time do I intend to till the clover under: I simply intend to mow it after the vegetables are finished.

To establish the stand of clover I intend to till the grass under, till a second time to make a good seed bed, broadcast the clover, and water it in. The grass must be tilled to kill it because grass in my yard can grow 4 feet tall, and the young clover would never have a chance of competing with that! However my lawn (which is of course mowed) has been a combination of grass and clover for the last 30 odd years, which means that clover should thrive as long as the sun can reach it.

At any rate, I have no idea how much clover seed I should use for a patch of sweet corn that is about 20 feet by 20 feet. I did ask the extension service how much seed, but they just said to not try it because it would be hard to establish a stand of clover and because the clover would compete with the corn for nutrients and water.

Now, I expect to fertilize, especially at first, and I also intend to water. If anything my grass is healthier next to the patches of clover, and so I do not think that there will be too much competition! Corn is, after all, a grass.

Lastly, Masanobu Fukuoka had clover in his rice fields, and he had excellent yields! So, I would still like to try this. If it works it works and if it doesn't then it doesn't.

The question remains: how much seed should I use? Because I really haven't a clue!

 
Dan Grubbs
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Location: northwest Missouri, USA
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Hi Terri
Not too far from you so I think we can safely make some assumptions. According to the folks at Univ. of MO, depending on which variety of clover you have, would be approx. 10lbs per acre. Now you have to do your math to divide that down. But, for more extensive info on seeding rates, check out the UM seeding rate chart here: http://extension.missouri.edu/p/g4652

 
Terri Matthews
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wonderfull! I thank you!
 
Lee Real
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I have a silly question in this topic. If Fukuoka don`t till, how he sow his rice? Just throwing seeds on the ground?
 
Terri Matthews
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Location: Eastern Kansas
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Lee Real wrote:I have a silly question in this topic. If Fukuoka don`t till, how he sow his rice? Just throwing seeds on the ground?


Yes.

After the first few years he made balls of seed and clay that he broadcast on the ground, which he said worked better for him, but that did not work well for me. I suspect that is because Japan is a wet country and my area has dry summers: I got far better results by just scattering wheat seeds in a mown lawn! (My area does not grow rice very well. the growing season is rather too short and the late summer is dry).

To read more: http://www.permies.com/forums/f-104/fukuoka
 
R Scott
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http://greencoverseed.com/smartmix-calculator/

You can add any/all of the seeds you want and it will show the "full" rate and then help you downrate based on a mixed planting. A little hard to understand at first, but really cool once you get the hang of it.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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