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Ways to Save Blossoms From Frost

 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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I am having trouble posting here because my writing is terrible.

I am going to keep this simple so it goes through.

How can we save blossoms?

cheers
Jeremy Martin
 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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Here are some ways.

Install misting systems to coat blossoms in ice.

Create micro climates.

Make sure trees have enough Nitrogen and select late blooming.

Plant trees midway up a hill.

cheers
Jeremy Martin
 
Alder Burns
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Location: northern California
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Two extremes of design…..
If the tree/shrub is small enough, throw a tarp or piece of plastic over it. Once in a bad frost, we had a campfire and I put a metal bucket of embers and hot ash under a piece of plastic thrown over a persimmon tree.
I have read than Native people used to deliberately burn the ground under hickory and walnut so that the sun would heat the charred black ground more than unburnt mulch, so as to radiate more warmth on cold nights…...
 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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Thanks for the feedback Alder.

I have thought of using frost cloth or tarps as well, this would work well with dwarf trees.

I read something similar about the thermal mass. it was about keeping the crass or herbaceous growth cut short. Which is basically the same concept.

Somebody mentioned keeping water in swales under trees and blocks of ice under trees as another meathod.

cheers
Jeremy
 
John Polk
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What really seems to be a crop killer is an early warm spell.
This can 'trick' the tree into breaking dormancy too early.

Two methods to deter early blossoming are to paint the trunks with white latex, which keeps the sap from flowing too early (and also deters wild critters from browsing), and the other is to keep the soil from prematurely warming. This can be done by piling snow around the base of the tree (the melt waters the root zone), or a very thick layer of mulch.

You are beyond this point now.
Since you have already blossomed, any of the previously mentioned techniques should help.

 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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Nice John

Thanks for the insight, somebody also recently told me to plant them in colder spots to compensate for the early warm spell which is whats been happening,

I wonder if you could paint the trees with brown latex paint because white looks terrible.

cheers
Jeremy
 
Michael Newby
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Jeremy martin wrote:Nice John

Thanks for the insight, somebody also recently told me to plant them in colder spots to compensate for the early warm spell which is whats been happening,

I wonder if you could paint the trees with brown latex paint because white looks terrible.

cheers
Jeremy


Two options are to plant many different varieties that all have different natural blooming times and to plant those different varieties in different micro-climates such as higher/lower elevation, North/South facing slopes, near rocks or ponds - if you do as many of these things as you can, you'll maximize the chance that some of the trees will be in the optimum conditions for them every year no matter what nature throws at you.

On another extreme, I've been known to install those cheap white incandescent christmas tree lights on customers' trees if they only have a handful of trees to protect.

Also, painting the trunk brown will do the opposite of the white paint reflecting the sunlight and minimizing warm-up of the tree. We will also mix sharp sand in with the paint which helps deter chewing.
 
Cam Mitchell
Posts: 108
Location: W. CO, 6A
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I can't find a reference for this right at the moment.
I remember the Extension service suggesting to water under the tree, because it would keep the tree a little warmer.
 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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Appreciate the input Micheal and Cam

Just read an article I found searching late blooming almond varieties and it did not look promising for zone 6a interesting article though. http://www.beesource.com/point-of-view/joe-traynor/march-blooming-almonds-an-answer-to-bee-problems/
 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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Doing more research I will share what I can find

Here is some information on a type of late blooming apples

Late Flowering apple tree Reinette d'Armorique when translated into french Pippin Armorica

http://www.dalicom.com/en/produits/view/87
http://www.mordusdelapomme.fr/spip.php?article67
http://www.ecomusee-rennes-metropole.fr/conserver-les-collections/vegetaux/item/reinette-d-armorique.html
http://37.59.58.36/conservatoire/pommes/reinette-darmorique
 
Cam Mitchell
Posts: 108
Location: W. CO, 6A
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Jeremy martin wrote:Appreciate the input Micheal and Cam

Just read an article I found searching late blooming almond varieties and it did not look promising for zone 6a interesting article though. http://www.beesource.com/point-of-view/joe-traynor/march-blooming-almonds-an-answer-to-bee-problems/

NP, Jeremy.
If you're interested, I found this apricot, whose pit can be used like an almond: http://www.starkbros.com/products/fruit-trees/apricot-trees/stark-sweetheart-apricot
 
Jeremy martin
Posts: 21
Location: Dixon, New Mexico Zone 6a
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Nice, wonder when they bloom?

 
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