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burdock leaves as mulch

 
Posts: 128
Location: Detroit, Michigan
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I remember reading about chop and drop with burdock leaves. I have a large patch of burdock and so yesterday I cut enough leaves to cover a recently sowed row in my garden. I'm not using them as weed suppressors but more to retain moisture for my recently sown seeds. I'd love to hear any thoughts on this. What would you do differently? TIA.
Mulching-with-burdock-leaves.jpg
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mulching with burdock
overturned-burdock-leaves.jpg
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mulching with burdock close-up photo
 
Posts: 7003
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Good idea, I think. Will you have to peek under the leaves to watch for germination and then remove them when plants are up? Keeping the soil moist through germination is always a problem for me....anything that works other than watering everyday with a sprinkling can sounds great.
I envy your large patch of burdock! it grows here but when I wanted to find some to transplant to our land I could not and ended up buying and trading for seed...my plants are very small so far. i see your lambs quarters too....we are eating it daily now along with dock.
 
Elissa Teal
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Location: Detroit, Michigan
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Judith Browning wrote:Good idea, I think. Will you have to peek under the leaves to watch for germination and then remove them when plants are up? Keeping the soil moist through germination is always a problem for me....anything that works other than watering everyday with a sprinkling can sounds great.
I envy your large patch of burdock! it grows here but when I wanted to find some to transplant to our land I could not and ended up buying and trading for seed...my plants are very small so far. i see your lambs quarters too....we are eating it daily now along with dock.



Yes, I am going NO-IRRIGATION this year. I was inspired by various talks given by Paul. Now, this row is not a hugulkultur row BUT I am just experimenting (it is very rich soil). He said that seeds that are not pampered with constant watering will become hardier (or die!) because the sprouts will send down more root to find water. Something like that.

Oh, I love wild spinach (lambsquarters). How do you like to consume it?
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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We generally eat lambsquarters cooked...steamed usually. It seems to cook up tender in just a short time and I've never had even July leaves be bitter. I keep pinching out the new leaf growth and the plants end up kind of bushy. It is our favorite and most prolific green from now through July.


 
Elissa Teal
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Judith Browning wrote:We generally eat lambsquarters cooked...steamed usually. It seems to cook up tender in just a short time and I've never had even July leaves be bitter. I keep pinching out the new leaf growth and the plants end up kind of bushy. It is our favorite and most prolific green from now through July.



My favorite way to eat them is in my daily green smoothie (sometimes in salad). And, I, too, pinch off the new leaf growth for consuming.
 
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Location: Vermont, annual average precipitation is 39.87 Inches
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I've been thinking about using burdock leaves as mulch in my strawberry bed so this post has good timing! I'll have to try it out and reply back about weed suppression.

My lambs quarters are still seedling size so all I've done with it so far is set it aside with all the other known edible "weeds" and thinnings to throw into quiche.
 
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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My neighbor's burdock gets massive. The larger specimens are about a wheelbarrow full each.
When I leave here, I plan to collect some burs from the largest ones.

Last year, I made the mistake of wandering through the patch while wearing my woolen pants.
I had enough burs attached to plant an acre.
My cats always show up with the things firmly attached to their coats.
They don't fall off - they were the inspiration for velcro.

 
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