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A lawn shears that doesn't suck

 
Posts: 232
Location: Southern Minnesota, USA, zone 4/5
12
duck forest garden trees woodworking
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I've had no good experiences with these things! One time I bought one made by fiskers because I thought it was a decent brand and it was such a bad design that it gave me a blister after literally a few minutes of use! And I have pretty tough hands! At least two other pairs have quickly broken and none of them have cut very well. I only have a small area around a fire pit and and by house entry ways that I like to keep looking neat and manicured and I really don't want to resort to an electric or gas powered weed whipper. The scythe works good when there aren't so many obstacles and I don't care about getting every single blade of grass.

Any brands or models currently being sold that you'd recommend?
shears.jpg
[Thumbnail for shears.jpg]
 
Posts: 1947
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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In my experience every pair of shears like this falls apart. Also the hand motion is fatiguing. I've given up on shears, a sickle is my tool of choice for this kind of detail work. No moving parts to break and the muscles used are larger and have more endurance.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3469
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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I like these: http://www.coronatools.com/item/gs-6750?referer=grass-shears

KISS. Keep It Stupid Simple.
 
Posts: 100
Location: Denver, Co 6000ft bentonite clay soil
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I have a pair of these and I love them:
http://www.leevalley.com/US/garden/page.aspx?p=47225&cat=2,2160,40708
 
Posts: 2413
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Hello All,

I wasn't sure which Jessica meant but if I do reach for something other than a kama 鎌 or hand scythe it is a traditional shear...again for me...the better ones are still handmade in Japan, Austria, and Latvia...

Regards,

j





 
S Haze
Posts: 232
Location: Southern Minnesota, USA, zone 4/5
12
duck forest garden trees woodworking
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Thanks for the tips!
I should try out a sickle or hand scythe sometime. I've been meaning to just didn't think of it right away when posting this. I'd still get a shears type too since it's a very small area I regularly maintain and it's probably more kid-friendly for when I ask my boys to clean up for a bonfire night.
 
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