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Permaculture Children's Assembly  RSS feed

 
                                  
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Greetings all from SW Missouri. I'd like to either find or somehow help create some type of place where children can learn real skills necessary for life, particularly for those who are already homeschooled or unschooled or whatever.

The place wouldn't be called a school though. Don't need all that regulation stuff. Perhaps just an assembly 4 days a week.

This is something I've been pondering lately, considering we have 5 children that are growing up bored and lonely.

By the way, my wife and I both grew up city slickers so we don't have any skills ourselves!

Dan



 
                                  
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I think one of the most basic skills that a child should learn is how to obtain water. Presently they grow up fearing rain and trusting in chlorinated/fluoridated etc. water that costs money. The reverse should be taught.
 
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Location: Alaska
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Well, water from the faucet is typically pretty inexpensive and energy efficient, and where were you raised that you were taught to fear rain? It's a standard to teach kids about the hydrological cycle when they are young. Getting a plot of land and teaching the kids to grow a garden would be a great first step. The word school doesn't have anything attached to it, think of Sunday school, they can say litterally what every they want in Sunday school.
 
Posts: 28
Location: Sierra Nevada foothills, zone 7
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Check out this site http://www.akamaibackyard.com/

She has a homeschool group that has converted a standard yard (lawn, etc) to a food-growing permaculture yard. Very inspiring website!
 
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Wow, Akimai Backyard is truly inspiring teaching!
 
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I want to thank the posters for recommending our film at www.akamaibackyard.com regarding our school permaculture project in Kauai.

I want to also acknowledge Skeeter, Michael Pilarski, as my main permaculture teacher that came to Kauai to strengthen our community with his knowledge.
 
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http://permaculture-design-course.com/
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