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Is a swimming pool considered as water storage?  RSS feed

 
Andrew Parker
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Location: Salt Lake Valley, Utah, hardiness zone 6b/7a
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When considering water storage restrictions, is a swimming pool considered as water storage?
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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depends who you ask. You need to dig into local ordinance. Some specifically address refilling pools with rainwater.
 
Andrew Parker
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Location: Salt Lake Valley, Utah, hardiness zone 6b/7a
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I was also considering storage of payed for but unused culinary water during low-use months.
 
John Devitt
Posts: 34
Location: Belfair WA
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It would be considered water storage for non-potable purposes. I would use if for clothes washing, toileting, washing the dog.

If you let it sit long enough, especially in sunlight the chlorine will dissipate. Filtered, it would be just as good as any other water for humans, unfiltered it would be fine for the garden and animals.
 
Shawn Harper
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Location: Portlandia, Oregon
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I see what your getting at, that might be a good way to get around the dept of making you sad.
 
John Polk
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When considering water storage restrictions, is a swimming pool considered as water storage?

Interesting question.

I would think that it could be considered 'end use', particularly if it was metered tap water that you have already paid for. If the city has charged you for the water they have delivered to you, I don't see where they have much say in how you use it.

Your info states that you are in Utah, which is certainly one of the strictest states in regards to water laws.

Regardless of which state one lives in, the following link will take you to a state by state listing of 'water withdrawal' regulations. For each state, there are also numerous links provided that should lead to other water laws. The site should not be considered as a final source, but it does have links that point to each state's water regulations. It is a good starting point to find state specific water rules and regulations.
http://www.ncsl.org/research/environment-and-natural-resources/state-water-withdrawal-regulations.aspx
 
Angelika Maier
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Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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Are there forest fires in your area? If yes you could band up with the local fire service, and tell you want to have water in case of a fire.
Or you set up an oversized aquaponic system, or a fish tank...the only thing is that usual water tanks are fully enclosed.
The best thing would be a class action against that law anyway.
 
Jeremiah Robinson
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Location: Madison, WI
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At the end of the day, what the regulations "say" and what they mean is entirely dependent on the local inspectors and your relationship with them.

Some are real meanies but will never come by unless someone complains. Others are proactive but will give you leeway if you're a reasonable person. Ask around.
 
John Polk
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Some are real meanies but will never come by unless someone complains

That seems to be the bottom line here in many areas of the western states.
Somebody complains, and 'the man' is obligated to investigate.

Often, it is a long time resident who has grown used to seeing brown lawns from mid summer to autumn.
Then a new neighbor moves in, and has a lush, green lawn all year long.
This new neighbor is very likely to get a visit from the enforcers.
That's when things like meters on wells happen.

 
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