• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Tree Crops by J. Russell Smith - FREE (legal) Download!

 
Grant Schultz
Posts: 219
Location: Iowa City, Iowa Zone 5
20
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
FREE DOWNLOAD. (completely legal, copyright free) Tree Crops by J. Russell Smith

One of the pest reference books for tree crops/forest farming on the planet.

http://www.versaland.com/2014/07/03/tree-crops-free-download/
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
Posts: 3646
Location: Vermont, off grid for 22 years!
78
bee chicken fungi solar trees
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One of my favorite books.
PDF also available here.
 
Abe Connally
Posts: 1502
Location: Chihuahua Desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I need to read it again, haven't read it in a few years. Every time I read it, I learn something new. It's one of my favorites, as well.
 
Stuart Johnson
Posts: 2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for sharing: looks like a great read. For the benefit of others, the content linked by Grant can also be reached directly at https://archive.org/details/TreeCrops-J.RussellSmith - which includes a good PDF copy (higher fidelity than the one linked by Cj) as well as scrappy, but still functional, OCR versions in Kindle, EPUB and text formats.
 
Dan Boone
gardener
Pie
Posts: 1686
Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a) ~39" rain/year
179
forest garden trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What an awesome book; I am reading it now with great interest.
 
Robert McEvoy
Posts: 20
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Got the link for this yesterday and started reading it at 4am since it was the most interesting option available. Love the dated lingo and reference to stone age woman being the sole cause to cereal grains. Other than that it was pretty cool to read over for a few hours and see what a visionary saw the future to possibly be and how it did not work out like that. Fascinating facts and numbers which would be difficult to get most anywhere else. I only wish we could read the graphs more easily, as they are in his own writing and did not transfer well. Any how thanks for the info and link and I hope I can use it as a reference one day!
EDIT: I didn't update this page from yesterday before I wrote this and just saw the post and link to a better PDF. Thanks for the link other guy.
 
Dan Boone
gardener
Pie
Posts: 1686
Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a) ~39" rain/year
179
forest garden trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There also turns out to be a little bit of casual racism in the book, which is not surprising given its time but may be distressing to modern readers. It's not at all what the book is *about* but it is in there in a few places.
 
mary yett
Posts: 73
Location: Manitoulin Island - in the middle of Lake Huron .Mindemoya,Ontario- Canadian zone 5
3
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A great book. Way ahead of its time in the vision of sustainability. I too learn something new from it every time I read it. If only government funded agricultural agencies had embraced this vision of food production when Smith first urged them to.

A few unfortunate culturally dated items that are a product of the time of writing - I can forgive these and give thanks for the bigger vision.
 
ben capozzi
Posts: 22
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just found this thread and link going through old daily-ish emails. Thanks for posting!
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1570
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
45
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just read the start of this book. Utterly brilliant so far.

I think that this book needs a series of threads, perhaps as was done with the Permaculture Designers Manual a while ago. There has been some progress made developing the trees he describes but the information is hard to access and sources of material are hard to find.

I spent a few hours researching the Honeylocust yesterday... there were some forage varieties bred back in about the 40s, but the research halted and was essentially lost following the advent of modern intensive farming (fertilised grain crops essentially). It sounds like only 4 named forage varieties are still around but they are very hard to get hold of and only seem to be in the USA and Canada.

It seems like there would be a lot of value to be had by a dedicated thread for each tree species discussed to fill in the gaps since the book was first published in the 1920s.
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
Posts: 3646
Location: Vermont, off grid for 22 years!
78
bee chicken fungi solar trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Michael Cox wrote:It sounds like only 4 named forage varieties are still around but they are very hard to get hold of and only seem to be in the USA and Canada.


Do you know what they are and where they can be found exactly? Links would be great. I've started some from seed (thornless but with the pods).

Maybe we could (re)read this as part of a winter book club?
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1570
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
45
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I found "Hershey" and "Millwood" (sometimes misnamed Milkwood on some websites). There were two other that I can't recall from memory. Hershey is supposed to be the best yielder of large heavy pods... 17 pods per lb, compared to 40 pods per lb for unimproved varieties. I'm starting a dedicated Tree Crops thread in the book review section.
 
mary yett
Posts: 73
Location: Manitoulin Island - in the middle of Lake Huron .Mindemoya,Ontario- Canadian zone 5
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would be interested to doing a winter book club thingy forum on this book, no shortage of interesting ideas to discuss. How does such a thing work?
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1570
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
45
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've started a thread on it here.

It doesn't seem as massive a project as the last one (The Permaculture Designers Manual), but feel free to chip in there. The book is great, but needs backing up with modern info.
 
Lance Kleckner
Posts: 114
Location: West Iowa
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cj Verde wrote:
Michael Cox wrote:It sounds like only 4 named forage varieties are still around but they are very hard to get hold of and only seem to be in the USA and Canada.


Do you know what they are and where they can be found exactly? Links would be great. I've started some from seed (thornless but with the pods).

Maybe we could (re)read this as part of a winter book club?


You can get them from Hidden springs nursery in TN, though seems like those selections besides ashworth aren't as cold hardy. My hershey was the first to die from a cold winter.
 
You can thank my dental hygienist for my untimely aliveness. So tiny:
The stocking-stuffer that plants a forest:
FoodForestCardGame.com
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic