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Nitrogen fixing trees for zone7

 
Adraina Robinson
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looking for nitrogen fixing trees for zone 7....any recommendations??
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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These are all in the Elaeagnaceae family :
Silverberry
Goumi
Autum Olive
Seaberry
buffaloberry

They also have edible berries.
 
Will Scoggins
Posts: 62
Location: Northeast Arkansas
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Mimosa (Japanese Silk) Trees grow extremely fast where I am(Zone 7-8 ). And once they are a certain size they can handle some pretty extreme pruning. I have used the ones that popped up along my fence row (I don't weed eat) to make trellises, plant stakes, blanket ladders, and the like. As a bonus it has pretty flowers.

I have read there are medicinal qualities, but cannot personally attest to them.
 
Cassie Langstraat
steward
Posts: 3914
Location: Zone 9b
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I found this site that might be helpful. It has mostly smaller trees and shrubs for your zone but it still would probably be helpful.

Nitrogen Fixing Trees and Shrubs
 
Michael Qulek
Posts: 148
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black locust, Honey Locust, Kentucky Coffee tree, Alder. Black Locust is my first choice because it is such excellent firewood. Honey Locust however produces edible pods.
 
Cassie Langstraat
steward
Posts: 3914
Location: Zone 9b
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Black locust for the win!
 
John Saltveit
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Ceanothus (California Lilac) is native. Alder might be too. Redbud has edible pods and early leaves, and shockingly beautiful purple leaves all over in the Spring.
John S
PDX OR
 
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