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Hi, Bob

Nice to meet you here. I am carrying out some research about Lepidium latifolium, I have noticed that it was recognized as an invasive plants in many states in the U.S.


Had you happen to collect some seeds of L. latifolium? I would appreciate very much if you could provide some seeds for me.
 
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Sorry, if I am correct this plant grows pretty much everywhere in the united states except for the 1/4 I live in!
 
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Location: Southern Indiana zone 5b
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Bob Dobbs wrote:Either erigeron/conyza bonariensis or conyza/erigeron canadensis. If the leaves are slightly hairy, canadensis, if the leaves are smooth, bonariensis. I guess bonariensis, though I can't quite tell 100% from the photo.

Winter/summer annual, tough to get rid of, host for a true bug that attacks legumes, and presumably has a taproot.

Thank my wife/girlfriend for this.




Hi Bob, thanks for the response and sorry for the delay getting back to this. I believe the picture quality may have caused a misidentification. Here is another one with a full bloom and a closer look at the non hairy leaves. Asteracea family?
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Bob Dobbs
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Got several botanists working on it right now.

We have a term for plants like these: DWC

means damned white composite.

Leaning more toward an aster right now.
 
Bob Dobbs
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Thank you for the better pictures.

We are leaning toward aster pilosus var demotus, or aster dumosus. Also called symphyotrichum (idiotic taxonomists.....)

That's as far as we can go with this one, composites are notoriously difficult to I.D, and doubly so from a picture.
 
George Meljon
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Location: Southern Indiana zone 5b
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Works for me! Thank you again. On to the next one, a sort of grass:
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Hey Bob, what is the largest oak species in the world? What is the tallest oak species in the world?
 
Bob Dobbs
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#1- the grass looks like an aristida, almost an educated guess. Grasses are impossible to identify without the seedhead present and blooming. Could also be a poa, but I don't think it is. Both genus are quite variable.

Give it about 2 more weeks and take another picture, get a closeup picture of the spikelet (flowering part) if you can.

#2- I've heard quercus lobata is the largest, though it is based on anecdotal information.
 
George Meljon
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Bob Dobbs wrote:#1- the grass looks like an aristida, almost an educated guess. Grasses are impossible to identify without the seedhead present and blooming. Could also be a poa, but I don't think it is. Both genus are quite variable.

Give it about 2 more weeks and take another picture, get a closeup picture of the spikelet (flowering part) if you can.

#2- I've heard quercus lobata is the largest, though it is based on anecdotal information.



Thanks Bob. I will go back and see what's developed out there on that grass. I thought the grasses would be tough. In the mean time here is the next one I have. I believe the seed heads here will tell a better tale.

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pollinator
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Location: zone 7
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So i know there are oxygenating plants for ponds and aquatic systems. Are there any land plants that "fix" oxygen into the soil?
 
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Bob,
I have a tree I can't find on the Internet It may be some kind of Mountain Ash, but it is not the one with berries on it. It has perfectly round fruit, yellow with red blush, bigger than golf balls. The fruit appears evenly distributed all over the tree. The leaves resemble a locust. Some locusts have red or yellow beans, so I thought it might b some kind of locust. I haven't got a clue.
I was going to call an expert to look at it last year, but next day. all fruit was gone and I couldn't find leaves on the ground. Right now, the leaves are even gone -- looks like something ate the leaves too I did not see fruit this year either. I have to get binoculars to see it...it's about 40 feet tall, very skinny tree on the edge of forest. Kentucky6
 
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Location: Houston, TX
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Would love some help identifying these guys. Houston Texas disturbed high pH soil

The grass is all over and there is a seed head in the top right of the closeup.
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Mickey Kleinhenz
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Location: Houston, TX
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and one more. This one is growing in very heavy compacted wet clay.

Thanks for the help.
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Bob Dobbs
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First grass, red seedheads: tridens flavus

Secpnd grass, pretty sure it is an andropogon species

Yellow flower, coreopsis species
possibly will i.d species tomorrow.
 
George Meljon
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Thank you Bob, very much
 
George Meljon
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I have a few more:

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Are fusiform initials parenchyma cells, collenchyma cells, or sclerenchyma cells?Do they have chloroplasts, chromoplasts, or proplastids?
 
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