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Evergreen fruit trees  RSS feed

 
Posts: 75
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I am looking for evergreen fruit trees.  

Zone 8 Central Mississippi.  I want to use them to obscure the view of an area and grow a border around our garden and orchard.  

I currently have a fruiting variety of elaeagnus and also several loquat trees I started from seeds and cuttings.

We are just above the line were citrus does well so if citrus it must be hardy.

Suggestions appreciated.
 
pollinator
Posts: 909
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Poncirus Trifoliata would work. The fruit isn’t very useful. There are some hybrids that might work good. I’ll try to find a website that sells them. I have it saved somewhere.
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
Posts: 909
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Oh, guess I don’t know if they’d be evergreen there. They go dormant farther north. I haven’t grown Citrus, but I’ve been reading up on it. I ordered some Poncirus seeds. I’m in MO so anything else is a long shot here.
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
Posts: 909
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I have not ordered from this company, but this site has a lot of good info. They are also great about answering questions by email.

http://mckenzie-farms.com/
 
pollinator
Posts: 1376
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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Ugni tastes good and looks nice. If loquats are hardy probably feijoas are hardy too and they taste delicious. For citrus I would choose cumquats they are quite cold hardy and make the best marmelade.
 
Posts: 75
Location: NRW/Germany
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Cephalotaxus (Plum Yew) and some Elaeagnus species are evergreen. You might want to have a look at the database at plants for a future, too. They list lots more.
 
pollinator
Posts: 971
Location: Longbranch, WA
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Evergreen huckleberry Vaccinium ovatumwebpage
 is the answer here in the pacific northwest.  Works very well as a screen between larger trees. can be sheared into any shape. I have some along my driveway that I have sheared into a 10 foot high wall.
 
gardener
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Pineapple guava would be my #1 pick.  For citrus, I would try Thomasville Citrangequat.  Best tasting hardy citrus.  Tastes like a lime, apparently.  I think I'm going to buy one this year myself.   I think our winters are a lot alike, but your summers are way hotter.
John S
PDX OR
 
pollinator
Posts: 2385
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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Citrus
Strawberry
Goumi and silverberry
Akebia
China Blue
Oregon Grape
Pineapple Guava
Onion/garlic family (fall-early summer)
Thyme/mint Family
 
Hans Quistorff
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Location: Longbranch, WA
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Oregon grape was mentioned but it would be to low growing for fence use.  Washington holly aka tall Oregon grape Mahonia aquifolium would be suitable and very desirable.
 
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Location: Cascadia
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I've been adding some olive trees to our orchard for the same reason. The Arbequina variety appears to be evergreen and it survived this winter with two separate weeks of snow in 7b PNW.
 
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Vern Life wrote:I've been adding some olive trees to our orchard for the same reason. The Arbequina variety appears to be evergreen and it survived this winter with two separate weeks of snow in 7b PNW.


Yes the olive trees are evergreen.
 
pollinator
Posts: 596
Location: Southern Arizona. Zone 8b
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Loquat trees/bushes perhaps.  They are hardy down to around 10 deg F, although temps below 27 will kill the flowers/fruit.  It can be either a short tree or large bush depending on the variety and how you trim it.  Eventually (50+ years?) it will get to be a largish tree (~35 ft tall).  The one I have now is maybe 8-10 years old and is perhaps 10-12 ft tall.

If you've never tasted loquats, they sort of taste like apricots dipped in honey.
 
pollinator
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Location: northern California
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What about the Pindo or Jelly palm (Butia)?  Very hardy, at least as hardy as a cabbage palmetto, and more drought-tolerant.  It keeps fronds near the ground for a long time, five or ten years even, and eventually produces big clusters of fruit sort of like dates in shape, with a large pit, but with juicy flesh sort of like pineapple.
 
master steward
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I don't know if you'd call it a fruit but what about bayberry?  
 
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