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Groasis Waterboxx

 
pollinator
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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There's another similar cocoon
but again expensive at 6.5 Euros each in bulk.
They look like they're made the same way as egg cartoons - cardboard pulp molded and dried.

Maybe you could take egg cartons and make the container part of the cocoon? Seal it with beeswax to make it water proof?
 
Graham Chiu
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand
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Having thought about this a bit more, unless you live in a desert, or, are unable to water your plants in a low rainfall area, then the condensation trap is unnecessary.  So, essentially the waterboxx becomes a mulch with the bottom of the box covering the ground surrounding the plant, there's a water container to hold the initial reservoir of water, and a wick to drip irrigate the ground.  There's also some mild protection from wind and animals when the plant is really small.  This keeps the plant alive long enough to establish a deep root structure so that it can eventually survive on itself without regular watering.  The boxx also captures some rain water.

It really sounds like a couple of plastic buckets, a wick, and a valve could work much the same way in non arid areas except that the UV will likely destroy the buckets in the first year or so.  I suspect the water collecting valve could be made from used condoms.  Which goes to show almost anything can be re-used.
 
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.... hate to say this, but I kinda want to call BS on the whole Groasis thing.

I really want to be wrong, but their "technology" has been around for over ten years now.
I don't think there are any good examples or updates posted to see ....anywhere.
Only thing out there are published reports/studies/demonstrations of the projects when they start, and/or after a year or so....
...where are the forests?  kinda joking with the "forests" term.  

But its really odd you can't find any long term updates. (prove me wrong and post here).

....say on a mass Groasis planting that's 8-10 years old that show some appreciable sized plants (small trees)?
I can't find much of anything.

EDIT:  to be clear, not used in a area with considerable precipitation, but the desert /arid examples .... I don't see those working out.
That is, examples in green areas of Spain, etc.   Wouldn't take much to get a tree to grow there.
 
Mikhail Mulbasicov
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Documenting other sources/examples of use of this (or similar) product(s).

------------------------------------------------------------

This guy is using them for an "orchard" in southern AZ.
....going to need some supplemental irrigation IMO.

https://youtu.be/2anli77IhLs?t=19

https://youtu.be/demCm38bsm0?t=202
 
Mikhail Mulbasicov
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Graham Chiu wrote:There's another similar cocoon

but again expensive at 6.5 Euros each in bulk.
They look like they're made the same way as egg cartoons - cardboard pulp molded and dried.

Maybe you could take egg cartons and make the container part of the cocoon? Seal it with beeswax to make it water proof?



---------------------------------------

Apparently, certain termites can eat the Groasis Paper version.
Paper may not be the way to go......even a one-time-disposable-use scenario.

https://youtu.be/YR14sZrzquI?t=46
 
Posts: 101
Location: California Zone 10b / Wyoming Zone 3b
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I’m going to be doing some experiments with these things soon.  Ordering a mix of trees (locust, Osage orange, & mountain ash) and some water boxes and will plant in the same areas with and without boxes.  See how it turns out.
 
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I have 20 of them. Haven't had the success manufacturer claims but they do work better than planting directly in the ground less time irrigating for sure. Maybe seventy percent survival rate and I have to fill them maybe three times a summer.  Using two wicks works best. I get eight inches of rain a year in Colorado
 
Alex Arn
Posts: 101
Location: California Zone 10b / Wyoming Zone 3b
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building woodworking homestead
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Well I planted 9 of them with a mix of tree species and we will see if any survive until next spring.  When I left all of them were slightly over full due to a passing rains storm and everything except the black locust seedlings were showing signs of life.  I did add stacks of cut logs on the upwind side (was supposed to be a hugelculture but ran out of time) to act as a wind break and maybe catch some snow drifts for insulation.   Fingers crossed.
 
Mikhail Mulbasicov
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Yeah, to be honest, I don't like the groasis waterboxx for a mass tree planting (reforestation) role.
Maybe in a (low water use) garden or orchard setting with intermittent maintenance its fine.

Some problems I've had:

- Tubes clog.
Even on the groasis website, their own promotional documentation/photos show the lid collecting with debris/sand. etc.
As well as rain and dew, the lids ALSO catch wind blown sand, silt, grass, plant matter, grass, seed, etc.  It all settles on the tube opening and clogs the tube.
The debris floats onto of the surface tension the water level inside the tube, solidifying there as the water level drops.
In a mass reforestation effort (10,000-100,000 units), the extra cost of the system is not worth it if the whole water collection system is so easily defeated...
...and the advantage the boxx can be reused.
One the box is only going to be a one time drain-down use, with no re-filling....
...you are better off it with a paper-version. (which Groasis sells along with Land Life Company).

- Gophers. etc.   Will dig under the boxx, chew on the wick.  
I had one where there was even  chew-marks on the plastic orifice where the wick protrudes out!
Those two boxxes I had were nearly empty; and all the others were still 75% full from the initial filling.
I believe the rodent were actually "drinking" the water down....
...or chewing the wick flush off make the boxes drain easier.

Other thoughts:

- The round Groasis Waterboxx is made of ..... plastic.
Some carbon there for sure, right?
I doubt they use recycled plastic for this application; the Boxx has to be quite durable and precisely made to work.
I will say, I'm impressed how all of the pieces fit together and function properly (in a sterile environment).

At least the options purported to be made of recycled paper.

The paper Growboxx and the Land Life Company Cocoon seem to hold a lot more water initially, (but seem to be set up to drain-down quicker)
 
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