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Perennial root vegetables

 
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Hi Anni-
I read in your introduction that you grow lots of perennial root vegetables. I'm very interested in this. Can you tell me which types you grow? I only grow leeks, crosnes/chinese artichoke, and Jerusalem artichoke/sunchoke.
Thanks,
John S
PDX OR
 
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Hi John

I grow Jerusalem artichoke, Chinese artichoke, scorzonera, oca, mashua, yacon, skirret, earth nut pea (lathyrus tuberosus), groundnut (apios americana), and yams (dioscorea). Ground nut and yams do not do as well in my climate as they would somewhere warmer. I am also experimenting with dahlias and tiger lilies (tigridia pavonia) but have not tasted them yet. I hope to try yet more roots and would refer you to the amazing blog http://radix4roots.blogspot.co.uk/ which has so many, many roots on it.

Anni
 
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Can you tell me more about Lathyrus tuberosus? I'm interested in growing this as i already grow lots of varieties of standard "English" or garden peas. There is some perennial sweet peas that grow nearby but i've never tried digging them up to see if they have any sizable roots. Plus Lathyrus tuberosus is the only one mentioned as being edible.
 
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Hi John,
In case you're still looking: Salsify is apparently perennial (read: invasive) in the pacific northwest once it's started. I've never eaten the other parts, but according to some, the whole thing is edible. Do be careful, as it can spread pretty aggressively. It's a really nice old-timey vegetable, though
 
John Suavecito
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We've had it show up in the yard.  By the time we figured out what it was, we couldn't quite eat it. But I will next time.   I am a big fan of feral vegetables.  Less work and more food for me.
John S
PDX OR
 
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Anni Kelsey wrote:Hi John

..... would refer you to the amazing blog http://radix4roots.blogspot.co.uk/ which has so many, many roots on it.

Anni



Thank you for sharing this link Anni! This blog is fantastic-so much great information and humorous too.
 
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