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Invasive vine in my lawn.  RSS feed

 
Jackie Neufeld
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My neighbour dumped her old hanging baskets and some invasive vines have gotten into our lawn. I'm trying to get rid of them by pulling out by hand but it's labour intensive. Is there anything else I can do?
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
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Location: northern northern california
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you can spray vinegar on them.

i havent ever tried this but i have read a lot of people saying it works.
usually i just let things be, but if theres something i really need to get rid of (like blackberries) i will dig up the roots and pull it out. more labor intensive but effective.
 
Jackie Neufeld
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Thanks Leila. I've tried the vinegar trick. Added dish soap too. I will look like it's dead but will revive. I suspect it just kills the foliage and not the roots.
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1159
Location: northern northern california
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apparently you have to do it on a dry day when theres full sun on the plant, it helps dry it out.

well i havent ever done this so maybe its not effective as i thought.

digging it up by the roots might be the way to go, even if it is tiring and work. sometimes stuff will still come back, but if you do it a few times over months you can usually make it completely go away. at least thats how it is with the blackberries...some stuff is really tenacious, like bindweed.

i kinda thought when i opened this thread, you were going to ask about bindweed...
 
Diane Lewis
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We had bittersweet in one of our paddocks this year, so I am very sympathetic. We usually would not have mowed that area until September to provide habitat for birds and insects, but we mowed it and that made a big difference. Then we manually removed the ones that survived repeated mowing with this awesome Fiskars weeder http://tghyp.com/?p=947. Other good and easy strategies include boiling water, horticultural vinegar (more concentrated than table vinegar), or a combination of vinegar and clove oil.

We also had a gaggle of bittersweet and porcelainberry creeping over the fence from a neighbor. I used three gallons of horticultural vinegar on these weeds and they didn't mind at all. In the end my husband cut them back and then we treated the stumps. They are much more vulnerable when they don't have leaves providing energy. This is also a good idea in slopes near streams where pulling out the weeds would cause erosion.
Another strategy is to suffocate the invasive plant with a heavy tarp, but that won't work in the middle of a lawn, it will kill took much lawn. It can work really well on large areas of phragmites, though.
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1977
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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Invasive vines! Argh!

There are plenty of weeds that are considered "noxious" that I have no problem with. Invasive vines are the only ones that get me concerned any more.

Asian bittersweet, Asian honeysuckle and field bindweed are my main concerns. The only way I've found to manage the bittersweet and honeysuckle successfully is to pull them all by hand, getting every bit of root. The bindweed is tricky. I've gone to a more nuanced conrol plan of pulling all aboveground bindweed at least once per week.

Do you know what vines you are working with? If you haven't identified them yet, do you have photos?
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