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Dr. Charlotte Gerson lecture on Gerson Therapy  RSS feed

 
Amedean Messan
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I believe she is 93 years old but she is still so incredibly vibrant. Really impressive woman who needs little introduction.


 
Dale Hodgins
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Charlotte Gerson isn't a doctor of anything, so far as I know. I first heard about the Gersons from Quack Watch.

The treatment has been around for about 80 years and during that time, they have never subjected it to clinical trials of a quality accepted by modern societies. Instead, they rely on testimonials and guesses from staff.

I have cured about the same number of cancer patients as they have. Our numbers of proven cases is identical.

Conspiracy to cover up and suppress, is cited by adherents as the reason that Gerson had his medical insurance and license suspended. This group has been invited many times to provide medical records and other data that could be used to prove their case. I'm not holding my breath.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Gerson
 
David Livingston
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Thanks for the link to Quackwatch I did not know it existed
David
 
Dale Hodgins
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Amedean Messan
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Dale Hodgins wrote:Charlotte Gerson isn't a doctor of anything, so far as I know. I first heard about the Gersons from Quack Watch.

The treatment has been around for about 80 years and during that time, they have never subjected it to clinical trials of a quality accepted by modern societies. Instead, they rely on testimonials and guesses from staff.

I have cured about the same number of cancer patients as they have. Our numbers of proven cases is identical.

Conspiracy to cover up and suppress, is cited by adherents as the reason that Gerson had his medical insurance and license suspended. This group has been invited many times to provide medical records and other data that could be used to prove their case. I'm not holding my breath.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Gerson


I am very familiar with Quackwatch but some of its opinions do not fully articulate evidence.

Quack Watch wrote:
Gerson Method

Proponents of the Gerson diet claim that cancer can be cured only if toxins are eliminated from the body. They recommend "detoxification" with frequent coffee enemas and a low-sodium diet that includes more than a gallon a day of juices made from fruits, vegetables, and raw calf's liver. This method was developed by Max Gerson, a German-born physician who emigrated to the United States in 1936 and practiced in New York City until his death in 1959. Gerson therapy is still available at Hospital Meridien in Tijuana, Mexico and, since February 1997, at the Gerson Healing Center in Sedona, Arizona.

Gerson therapy is still actively promoted by his daughter, Charlotte Gerson, through lectures, talk show appearances, and publications of the Gerson Institute in Bonita, California. Gerson protocols have included liver extract injections, ozone enemas, "live cell therapy," thyroid tablets, royal jelly capsules, linseed oil, castor oil enemas, clay packs, laetrile, and vaccines made from influenza virus and killed Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

In 1947, the NCI reviewed ten cases selected by Dr. Gerson and found his report unconvincing. That same year, a committee appointed by the New York County Medical Society reviewed records of 86 patients, examined ten patients, and found no evidence that the Gerson method had value in treating cancer. An NCI analysis of Dr. Gerson's book A Cancer Therapy: Results of Fifty Cases concluded in 1959 that most of the cases failed to meet the criteria (such as histologic verification of cancer) for proper evaluation of a cancer case [16]. A recent review of the Gerson treatment rationale concluded: (a) the "poisons" Gerson claimed to be present in processed foods have never been identified, (b) frequent coffee enemas have never been shown to mobilize and remove poisons from the liver and intestines of cancer patients, (c) there is no evidence that any such poisons are related to the onset of cancer, (d) there is no evidence that a "healing" inflammatory reaction exists that can seek out and kill cancer cells [17].

Between 1980 and 1986 at least 13 patients treated with Gerson therapy were admitted to San Diego area hospitals with Campylobacter fetus sepsis attributable to the liver injections [18]. None of the patients was cancer-free, and one died of his malignancy within a week. Five were comatose due to low serum sodium levels, presumably as a result of the "no sodium" Gerson dietary regimen. As a result, Gerson personnel modified their techniques for handling raw liver products and biologicals. However, the Gerson approach still has considerable potential for harm. Deaths also have been attributed to the coffee enemas administered at the Tijuana clinic.

Charlotte Gerson claims that treatment at the clinic has produced high cure rates for many cancers. In 1986, however, investigators learned that patients were not monitored after they left the facility [19]. Although clinic personnel later said they would follow their patients systematically, there is no published evidence that they have done so. Three naturpaths who visited the Gerson Clinic in 1983 were able to track 18 patients over a 5-year period (or until death) through annual letters or phone calls. At the 5-year mark, only one was still alive (but not cancer-free); the rest had succumbed to their cancer [20].


One thing I am having difficulty with Quack Watch's selective evidence. There are many successful patients of the therapy which have been minimized by this article. I have read many articles highly skeptical of of Dr. Gerson's work from other sources, but I also have read many articles praising her work. I also follow a group on Facebook who follow the Gerson protocol and have read stories of patients who have not survived cancer, but I have read enough stories of patients who do progress where I find myself having difficulty discrediting the therapy. The therapy itself has less success on some forms of cancer which she does communicate. It's hard for me to call the therapy quackery because there is strong evidence of its effectiveness in many patients. One thing I do like to highlight is that it is marketed as more a therapy and less of a cure, although I see some of Dr. Gerson's language at times slightly egotistical or confident due to experience. I am not sure which is which at this moment. If there is any example to highlight here is Dr. Gerson's current health at her advanced age which is exemplary in comparison to the average lifespan of fellow medical doctors.
 
Celia Revel
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Academia does not use wikkipedia as a reliable source of information because of its open source nature and because it can be abused. It is generally considered by complimentary medicine as highly biased against alternative sources. It generally maximizes the risks of alternative methods and minimizes its benefits. It does the reverse for orthodox medicine. I have used many of the principals of the Gerson method in my general health and healing routine, and many of my own disease conditions have disappeared. In addition, I know of many more people, personally, who have done the same things and have benefited tremendously. If I had have listened to Quackwatch and wikkipedia, I would still be suffering.

I havent visited a doctor in over two years. Im 50 years old without any conditions, medications or aches or pains. mMy last visit with my own personal physician ended in a conversation about drug companies. My doctor said, Theyre the maffia.

Heres another thing to consider. The FDA can raid and take a practitioners medical records, and then claim they have no records to back up their claims. I heard this on the internet somewhere, and like everything else, should be taken with a grain of salt.

(sorry about no apostrophes or quotes, my keyboard is missing those keys)
 
Matt Grantham
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I am hoping this discussion can remain civil since it is a hot topic for most of us. If Dale could provide some additional information on how and when the Gersons were invited to demonstrate the efficacy of their dietary treatments I would be interested. the Gerson institute does keep records of their success rates and hosts large amounts of individual testimonials which can be verified. As for Wikipedia and Quackwatch, I would suggest the credential of these organizations do need some questioning. Wikipedia does not seem to fall victim of the random pitfalls that an open soure publication might fall prey too, but instead seems to have a rather systemic proclivity to castigate alternative health approaches while always quoting quackwatck. Here is a link supplying additional information on quackwatch

http://www.quackpotwatch.org/quackpots/quackpots/barrett.htm


Also

“I see, in Dr. Max Gerson, one of the most eminent geniuses in medical history”
Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Dr. Albert Schweitzer
 
Matt Grantham
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Gerson Method

Proponents of the Gerson diet claim that cancer can be cured only if toxins are eliminated from the body. They recommend "detoxification" with frequent coffee enemas and a low-sodium diet that includes more than a gallon a day of juices made from fruits, vegetables, and raw calf's liver. This method was developed by Max Gerson, a German-born physician who emigrated to the United States in 1936 and practiced in New York City until his death in 1959. Gerson therapy is still available at Hospital Meridien in Tijuana, Mexico and, since February 1997, at the Gerson Healing Center in Sedona, Arizona.

Gerson therapy is still actively promoted by his daughter, Charlotte Gerson, through lectures, talk show appearances, and publications of the Gerson Institute in Bonita, California. Gerson protocols have included liver extract injections, ozone enemas, "live cell therapy," thyroid tablets, royal jelly capsules, linseed oil, castor oil enemas, clay packs, laetrile, and vaccines made from influenza virus and killed Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

In 1947, the NCI reviewed ten cases selected by Dr. Gerson and found his report unconvincing. That same year, a committee appointed by the New York County Medical Society reviewed records of 86 patients, examined ten patients, and found no evidence that the Gerson method had value in treating cancer. An NCI analysis of Dr. Gerson's book A Cancer Therapy: Results of Fifty Cases concluded in 1959 that most of the cases failed to meet the criteria (such as histologic verification of cancer) for proper evaluation of a cancer case [16]. A recent review of the Gerson treatment rationale concluded: (a) the "poisons" Gerson claimed to be present in processed foods have never been identified, (b) frequent coffee enemas have never been shown to mobilize and remove poisons from the liver and intestines of cancer patients, (c) there is no evidence that any such poisons are related to the onset of cancer, (d) there is no evidence that a "healing" inflammatory reaction exists that can seek out and kill cancer cells [17].

Between 1980 and 1986 at least 13 patients treated with Gerson therapy were admitted to San Diego area hospitals with Campylobacter fetus sepsis attributable to the liver injections [18]. None of the patients was cancer-free, and one died of his malignancy within a week. Five were comatose due to low serum sodium levels, presumably as a result of the "no sodium" Gerson dietary regimen. As a result, Gerson personnel modified their techniques for handling raw liver products and biologicals. However, the Gerson approach still has considerable potential for harm. Deaths also have been attributed to the coffee enemas administered at the Tijuana clinic.

Charlotte Gerson claims that treatment at the clinic has produced high cure rates for many cancers. In 1986, however, investigators learned that patients were not monitored after they left the facility [19]. Although clinic personnel later said they would follow their patients systematically, there is no published evidence that they have done so. Three naturpaths who visited the Gerson Clinic in 1983 were able to track 18 patients over a 5-year period (or until death) through annual letters or phone calls. At the 5-year mark, only one was still alive (but not cancer-free); the rest had succumbed to their cancer [20].


Matt responds

Unlike Amedean's response, which is a rather calm and moderate assessment of the efficacy of Gerson therapy itself, I would instead like to highlight the nature of Quackwatch's attack. Quackwatch never fields the most basic question of whether or not the Gerson program actually works. The 50 patients are dismissed on the grounds of violation of protocol rather that really presumes to call both the patients and Gerson liars because NCI was not satisfied with the paperwork. The poisons in processed food apparently remain a mystery the MR Barret of Quackwatch, who is also not a doctor though he calls himself one.The liver is the major detoxification organ in the body and to assert it's function would not be related to cancer again shows an utter contempt for common sense. As long as they can parrot the old ' there is no proof" of any given Gerson assertion we nonetheless end up with an irrational following inference no proof is somehow the same as a positive refutation for the claim livers have something to do with immune functioning and the bodies ability to resist cancer cells

There seems to be no citation that deaths occurred that were contributed to the enema therapy. I can find no clear evidence for this claim, and claims with such a low level of credibility do not belong in the conversation. Then we have the claim that some patients were not monitored after the clinic. Well how many? Two out of hundreds. Do a few that were not monitored nullify the information that was gathered with patients who were followed up on?. And then again, picking up on 17 particular patients who were followed up on. We do not know there ages, or the stage of cancer they had. Gerson keeps statistics on thousands of patients so why not dare look at the figures in a comprehensive manner than this clear strategy of cherry picking very small groups of patients to try to make their points. I see no evidence for the claim that 13 patients went to SD hospitals in the 80's. even it were true apparently the last 25 years have been just fine
 
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