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Acorn Flour First Attempt

 
Devon Deshotels
Posts: 6
Location: St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, USA
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So I've gathered acorns from two quercus nigra about 15 miles apart from each other and have soaked them for over 12 hours and the acorns are now drying. my goal is to make any amount of flour and use it to make a small cake, possibly with blue berries grown near my house. i know i probably should just wait until the experiment is done with to post but I'm kind of hoping for tips or ideas from anyone who may have done this before. I will crack them tomorrow and begin leaching tannins. I'm hoping it'll amount to a cup or so. AFter shelling I will crush them slightly, then put into bucket with water.
if i remember by the time i'm done, i will post results.

 
Ray Moses
Posts: 70
Location: Brighton, Michigan
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I Make something with my red oak acorns a couple times a week as I have several bushels stored , mostly pumkin acorn bread with black walnuts and autumn olive berries.just wondering why you are soaking them before you crack. I harvest and put in mesh produce bags and put by the wood stove to dry for couple weeks then hang outside in barn rafters. I crack with a drill cracker, grind into a fine mill flour with my food processor and then put into a colander lined with a t shirt and fill with warm water and let drain and refill as needed. Usually takes half a day of leaching to get a sweet tannin free flour. White oak nuts you can do several changes of boiling water if you want acorns as nut pieces but red oak group acorns don't leach we'll this way so grinding and percolate method is best and fast. I also make hummus with my acorn mill.
 
Devon Deshotels
Posts: 6
Location: St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, USA
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that sounds like a pretty good method you've got! i've read that soaking them then drying them shrinks the meat to make shelling easier...
but i believe i'll try your method instead. there's still literally tons of red acorns around my home and where i work. i'm actually rather fond of the little grubs you find in acorns. the fat one's especially. they're pretty easy to spot before cracking them open. thanks for your reply!
 
Ray Moses
Posts: 70
Location: Brighton, Michigan
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Oh so that is why you soak them, let me know if that works. I know that the nuts I let dry for a few weeks are easier to separate the nut meats then when I first gather them. I am eating some acorn flat bread tonight that I made this morning. It is a flat bread because that seems like the only way I can get it to cook well unless I blend it with 50% wheat flour. I mixed a half cup arrow root with two cups acorn mill, 1/2 cup black walnuts, 1/4 cup autumn olive berries and threw in some cinimon. I am heating it on the wood stove right now and then will put some apple sauce on it.
 
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