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Can you plant pasture with a discer?

 
Posts: 1827
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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I was hoping to disc, throw out the seed then disc again. Or can I just throw out seed? Thoughts welcome.
 
Posts: 204
Location: east and dfw texas
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That's the way I do it.
Just throwing out seed most wont sprout they have to be in contact with dirt or covered
I disk then seed by hand then , disk again or drag something to cover seed.
 
pollinator
Posts: 681
Location: northwest Missouri, USA
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Frost heave is also an approach to allow seed to make contact with soil. You can broadcast seed where there is freeze/frost heave that makes the soil available. You might also consider a drag harrow after broadcasting your seed. A delicate balance between getting seed in contact while disturbing the soil as little as possible. Take photos of what you do and document your progress ... I'm sure we'll all want to see how what you do worked for you.
 
Posts: 3370
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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That is how we planted all our oats growing up as a kid, a 100+ acres. Works better for some seeds than others.
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1827
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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So how about a box scraper then. I have a box scraper. I'd either have to buy or rent a discer.
 
R Scott
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No on the box scraper. If we are talking a lawn size area, you could put the rippers down and scratch the surface, but it would probably take several passes. Hand seed, then drag the seed in with tree branches, scrap iron, old fence panels, etc. But it will be worth renting something to save the time and fuel if we are talking a sizeable area.

If you are going to rent, renting a no till drill will get it done better. But that might be $$$
 
Posts: 14
Location: Stettler, AB Zone 3
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Running livestock over an area where you've just broadcast seed can help push the seed into contact with the soil. This can also help reduce shading by the established plants. If rain is likely within a day or two, I'll spread seed over an area, then move my sheep onto the area and let them graze it hard.

This has worked well for me in the past, better than frost seeding, but I can't compare it to discing or harrowing before/after broadcasting seed as I've never tried those approaches.
 
elle sagenev
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R Scott wrote:No on the box scraper. If we are talking a lawn size area, you could put the rippers down and scratch the surface, but it would probably take several passes. Hand seed, then drag the seed in with tree branches, scrap iron, old fence panels, etc. But it will be worth renting something to save the time and fuel if we are talking a sizeable area.

If you are going to rent, renting a no till drill will get it done better. But that might be $$$



I just called around to see if anyone had a drill and no one did. So back to the discer I suppose.
 
elle sagenev
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Mark Fox wrote:Running livestock over an area where you've just broadcast seed can help push the seed into contact with the soil. This can also help reduce shading by the established plants. If rain is likely within a day or two, I'll spread seed over an area, then move my sheep onto the area and let them graze it hard.

This has worked well for me in the past, better than frost seeding, but I can't compare it to discing or harrowing before/after broadcasting seed as I've never tried those approaches.



The livestock thing is hard. I don't have any so I'd have to import some. Plus the whole, having nothing for them to eat, thing.
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Scan craigslist, I bought a disc for scrap metal value. It was so old it has wooden bearings, but works for as little as I do.
 
Posts: 724
Location: In a rain shadow - Fremont County, Southern CO
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you may also call the county extension office.
i know my local office has a no till seeder that can be rented/borrowed

 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1827
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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Kelly Smith wrote:you may also call the county extension office.
i know my local office has a no till seeder that can be rented/borrowed



I did. And they didn't.
 
Dan Grubbs
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You can find drag harrows around for next to nothing (sometimes for nothing!). Many row crop farmers have them piled up in their scrap metal piles as they have long since abandoned that approach to farming. I'd put out the word in your local network of people that you're looking to take a old drag harrow off someone's hands.
 
elle sagenev
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Dan Grubbs wrote:You can find drag harrows around for next to nothing (sometimes for nothing!). Many row crop farmers have them piled up in their scrap metal piles as they have long since abandoned that approach to farming. I'd put out the word in your local network of people that you're looking to take a old drag harrow off someone's hands.



Ha. I should get 2 of those and have my nieces and nephews practice driving with one behind the truck.
 
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