• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Greg Martin
  • Leigh Tate

strawberry tree

 
Posts: 41
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
not really hugelkultur - but shares some roots

I have a HUGE tree that died and it broke in half and fell. The remaining half of the tree is a 12-foot tall "stump"

I'm a plumber. I have a 3-1/2" boring bit in my bag of tools.

Instead of taking down the 12-foot tall stump.
I'm thinking to take my boring bit and bore out holes as deep as the bit will go (about 8" deep). Bore the holes at a 45-degree angle
Fill with topsoil and plant strawberries (and some herbs and etc.... but mostly strawberries)

Then go to the very top and use the chainsaw to create a basin about 12" deep - and bore more holes in the bottom of the basin (to make it deeper)
till that with topsoil and plant. The deep basin would allow the stump the hold water
and I don't know if the roots would pull up water from the soil anymore or not.

anyways. that's the plan
any ideas on whether or now it would work?
Because I think a 12-foot tall strawberry tree would be cool as hell.
 
gardener
Posts: 6696
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1356
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
sounds like a very cool idea. Unless the center of the tree stump is already rotting there probably won't be much in the way of water migration going on until that center begins to rot. All this means is that you will need to water the strawberries at least weekly. Since you say the tree was dead, there will be no water uptake from the roots. The fact that it broke in half might mean it is rotten in the heartwood, when you get up there with the chain saw you should be able to tell.
 
Posts: 14
Location: Athens, Ga moving to Little River, SC soon
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am awaiting pics, sounds great to me, try it and keep us posted.
 
Posts: 103
Location: Foot of the Mountain, Front Royal VA
2
hugelkultur fungi chicken
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Great timing. I have several stumps that are hollow. From 4 to 5 feet tall. I have been wondering what to put in them. Some open up to the ground, others not.

I would also much enjoy pictures. Any other ideas for hollow logs and or stumps?

I think this could have amazing potential.
gift
 
Rocket Mass Heater Manual
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic