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Planting lettuce, now.

 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1268
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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So waiting for the end of May is killing me. I want to plant lettuce now. We have this sun room, you see. It is not all that sunny actually. It was attached to the house when we bought it. I wouldn't have put it there. The garage juts out and blocks most of the light so it's more of a partial sun room. Anyway, the point is that it is protected from the elements. Think I can start lettuce in there NOW?
 
John Wolfram
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Location: Lafayette, Indiana
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elle sagenev wrote:Think I can start lettuce in there NOW?

Go for it! Worst case scenario is that you end up wasting some cheap lettuce seeds.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Lettuce, peas, favas, cilantro, and garbanzos are very cold hardy. Volunteers of these crops have already germinated in my garden. They came up about the same time as the crocus started flowering. I normally time outdoor planting of these crops for about the time the forsythia start blooming. For me that's right now.

Wyoming is a big place, but as long as your garden isn't covered in snow, might as well plant some outside. It's certainly not too early to be starting them inside either.

 
Tate Smith
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Location: Cheyenne, WY
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Elle,

By the time those seeds get up and going it will be perfect timing to transplant. They are starting gardens in Windsor south of us. Everybody says we are a month behind in the spring and a month ahead in the fall. So with 30 days in your "sun room" they will be ready to go!!

I would also suggest checking out Holzer's seeding method as reference for this fall. He literally walks around with a bucket full of seeds and broadcasts everywhere. Probably not the most efficient for a kitchen garden, but it would be really interesting to do a bit of an experiment and till a strip on contour to broadcast into and broadcast into your untilled ground with big OM producers like Zucchinis, Pumpkins, Watermelons. And then also some persistent annual volunteerish species like the mustard family garden species. The snow is a great "seed setter" and will take the seeds right down to the right depth and then insulate them through the winter.

Something to think about for next fall, since the ground is already frozen, it probably wouldn't be worth it to try right now.
 
elle sagenev
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Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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Tate Smith wrote:Elle,

By the time those seeds get up and going it will be perfect timing to transplant. They are starting gardens in Windsor south of us. Everybody says we are a month behind in the spring and a month ahead in the fall. So with 30 days in your "sun room" they will be ready to go!!

I would also suggest checking out Holzer's seeding method as reference for this fall. He literally walks around with a bucket full of seeds and broadcasts everywhere. Probably not the most efficient for a kitchen garden, but it would be really interesting to do a bit of an experiment and till a strip on contour to broadcast into and broadcast into your untilled ground with big OM producers like Zucchinis, Pumpkins, Watermelons. And then also some persistent annual volunteerish species like the mustard family garden species. The snow is a great "seed setter" and will take the seeds right down to the right depth and then insulate them through the winter.

Something to think about for next fall, since the ground is already frozen, it probably wouldn't be worth it to try right now.


I broadcast sewed a lot of greens and root crops on my berms after planting last year. We had some magnificent lettuce from it.
 
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