Less than 24 hours left in our kickstarter!

New rewards and stretch goals. CLICK HERE!



  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Permaculture Projects for Under $20?  RSS feed

 
Thomas Partridge
Posts: 130
Location: Zone 7a
3
books chicken duck
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So I just had an idea and while I am not sure if someone else has had the same idea or one that is very similar, I thought I would ask anyway.

Does anyone know of any good permaculture concepts that could be demonstrated with under $20.00. I wouldn't be opposed to ideas that used recycled (and as such free) materials, but if they did use such materials they would have to be readily available pretty much everywhere all the time. Assume only the use of basic tools (shovels and buckets not chainsaws and excavators). I think it would be an interesting weekly or monthly article or video since so many are like me where we are learn by doing types and would love to have little $20.00 projects we could do on the homestead to get a real grasp on things.

 
Pia Jensen
Posts: 218
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here is something I am getting ready to do.

In order to build more Hugelkultur, I need more big wood. I also need a lot of cardboard boxes. I have no vehicle. I don't want to hire a truck.

People are doing some big pruning in the area.
Cut branches and trunks are laying on the sidewalks. As are stacks of cardboard.

I have already started Hugelkultur beds (as well as swales, canals, and drains).
People are curious about different (new to them) agriculture techniques (there's a lot of farmland and farmers around this city).

I already established a relationship with the city maintenance folks about solutions for their rain smashed hill that spews rock and sand down the street in the big rains.

I'm going to see if the city can have tree cuts and cardboard dumped in my front yard and I'll host some mini-hugel tours.... I'll put a sign out front on the street also...if it works, I'll get a lot of wood and cardboard for @ 20% effort and no money will have crossed hands.
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1275
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'd say a lot of my projects are like that. The strawberry pyramid I made on my blog cost me nothing. I got the tires used and hauled in fresh horse manure. The strawberries were a gift. I have quite a few toys for the kids in the yard that cost nothing. My garden beds pretty much cost nothing but seeds. I start my seeds in recycled materials. Yeah, I do a lot on the cheap.
 
Thomas Partridge
Posts: 130
Location: Zone 7a
3
books chicken duck
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
elle sagenev wrote:I'd say a lot of my projects are like that. The strawberry pyramid I made on my blog cost me nothing. I got the tires used and hauled in fresh horse manure. The strawberries were a gift. I have quite a few toys for the kids in the yard that cost nothing. My garden beds pretty much cost nothing but seeds. I start my seeds in recycled materials. Yeah, I do a lot on the cheap.


Well not quite, see not everyone can get fresh horse manure (or any usable manure) for free and get it transported to their property for free. They also can't necessarily get strawberries for free. For these ideas I would want it to be things that I can say "You should be able to get this for free at anytime of your choosing regardless of where you are" and that to be true (within reason). So while I would concede that free tires are not too hard to come by or transport to a property, the other ones for this $20.00 limit would have to have price tags associated with them. This article or video I would want to make wouldn't be about what I could do with stuff that I had gotten for free, but stuff that anyone could do with materials that cost under $20.00 that are pretty much universally available. I could for example do one that had dirt that was free since it came from their yard, but not one that used "free" wood chips since in some areas you can get wood chips for free sometimes or barter for them.

I suppose I phrased the initial problem poorly, I should say does anyone know any projects that highlight permaculture concepts where the combined materials would be valued at $20.00 or less.
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1275
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Charles Kleff wrote:
elle sagenev wrote:I'd say a lot of my projects are like that. The strawberry pyramid I made on my blog cost me nothing. I got the tires used and hauled in fresh horse manure. The strawberries were a gift. I have quite a few toys for the kids in the yard that cost nothing. My garden beds pretty much cost nothing but seeds. I start my seeds in recycled materials. Yeah, I do a lot on the cheap.


Well not quite, see not everyone can get fresh horse manure (or any usable manure) for free and get it transported to their property for free. They also can't necessarily get strawberries for free. For these ideas I would want it to be things that I can say "You should be able to get this for free at anytime of your choosing regardless of where you are" and that to be true (within reason). So while I would concede that free tires are not too hard to come by or transport to a property, the other ones for this $20.00 limit would have to have price tags associated with them. This article or video I would want to make wouldn't be about what I could do with stuff that I had gotten for free, but stuff that anyone could do with materials that cost under $20.00 that are pretty much universally available. I could for example do one that had dirt that was free since it came from their yard, but not one that used "free" wood chips since in some areas you can get wood chips for free sometimes or barter for them.

I suppose I phrased the initial problem poorly, I should say does anyone know any projects that highlight permaculture concepts where the combined materials would be valued at $20.00 or less.


If you are counting gas then nothing will ever fit your needs. The tires I used were free but I did pick them up in my SUV and cart them home. The manure was free but I had to drive my car over, load it up, and cart it home. I'd also argue that making connections with other people is the only way to get things done for free. I have a massive stack of phone poles on my property that will fuel a ton of projects. They were brought to us and dropped off for free. The railroad was redoing it's lines, we knew someone that worked for the railroad and he simply told the people who were handling the poles where we lived. They'd have to pay to dump the poles at the dump so they were more than happy to bring them to us for free. Same with those strawberries. If you know someone who has a strawberry bed gone wild you can get starts.

I think anyone COULD do free projects, if they took the time to make connections.
 
Thomas Partridge
Posts: 130
Location: Zone 7a
3
books chicken duck
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Let us try to shift it in a different direction then since there will always be a fundamental difference of opinion on what should count as free materials.

Does anyone have any ideas for projects that would allow people to learn about permaculture concepts where all the materials had to be purchased but could be purchased for under $20.00?
 
Pia Jensen
Posts: 218
4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Charles Kleff wrote:Let us try to shift it in a different direction then since there will always be a fundamental difference of opinion on what should count as free materials.

Does anyone have any ideas for projects that would allow people to learn about permaculture concepts where all the materials had to be purchased but could be purchased for under $20.00?


ah....

for about $10 (or less if you live with clay in your area's soil) you can buy enough clay (low or high fire) to make water receptacles to place in a planted bed to slow release water.

or, for about $11 plant a lovely Red Hedge, Salix alba 'Flame' Willow in a soppy wet area to use that excess water and to cut branches from later to make house furnishings... use the remaining $9 for nails and twine...

 
chad Christopher
Posts: 296
Location: Pittsburgh PA
9
chicken duck forest garden fungi trees woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Plant identification classes, urban foraging, bicycle repair, invasive removal parties, clean-up parties? Permaculture isn't all food forests and market gardens, we forget about the people care part.

what about measuring conture. Water and string levels, measuring shade cast, with tape measures, smart phone compasses, and calculators. Teaching concepts are free. Find a church, community center, fire house, police station, or an abandoned lot. Transform it to a edible landscape, all these places have funds for such things. All the materials for building a rain barrel can usually be obtained for under 20 bucks, when you build it, make it a class, request tools if you don't have them.
 
Tom OHern
Posts: 236
Location: Seattle, WA
12
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Charles Kleff wrote:Does anyone have any ideas for projects that would allow people to learn about permaculture concepts where all the materials had to be purchased but could be purchased for under $20.00?


So I think the disconnect here is that there is not going to be a project like that which will teach you permaculture concepts. There are tons of ways that someone who knows permaculture concepts can apply that knowledge to projects to make them cost very little. Permaculture isn't about the projects, it is about doing projects differently. Permaculture isn't about hugelculture, herb spirals, cob building, or growing food, but it can incluse all of those things and more. I can raise chickens, or I can raise chickens according to permaculture concepts. I can plant a garden or I can plant a garden using permaculture concepts. And I can write down the steps for how I raise chickens or plant my garden, and you can copy them exactly, but that doesn't teach you permaculture. And even if you do it my way, it doesn't mean you are necessarily following permaculture concepts becasue part of permaculture is about using the resources you already have which maybe different than what I have.

People need to first learn about permaculture, and then they need to apply it to the projects that they want to do. And there are hundreds of free resources for learning permaculture concepts. And once someone has learned those concepts, they should have no problem coming up with projects that they can do themselves.
 
chad Christopher
Posts: 296
Location: Pittsburgh PA
9
chicken duck forest garden fungi trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Bingo tom, and I would like to add, maybe spend 60 or so on materials, to host a class, and use the appreciated donations, to fund a grander project. Yea, maybe not everyone has money to spend, but there are people who do, and are more than willing, when they know the profit is going to fund more educational projects, free or not. I have learned the most from working with a group of individuals, on a random project, than I ever have from a school,, or pdc.
 
Thomas Partridge
Posts: 130
Location: Zone 7a
3
books chicken duck
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So it seems the general consensus is that what I am imagining happening is not something that realistically can happen. I am saddened by this because I thought it would be a neat idea, a way to make some of the concepts more approachable.

I also do not believe in hosting classes in person, but that is another story .
 
Pia Jensen
Posts: 218
4
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Charles Kleff wrote:So it seems the general consensus is that what I am imagining happening is not something that realistically can happen. I am saddened by this because I thought it would be a neat idea, a way to make some of the concepts more approachable.

I also do not believe in hosting classes in person, but that is another story .


oh... wait.. I contributed what I felt were two valid ideas (earlier).. what exactly are you trying to accomplish? make a list of things people can do for less than $20? That can be done.
 
Thomas Partridge
Posts: 130
Location: Zone 7a
3
books chicken duck
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I apologize Pia, I didn't mean to suggest that your ideas were not excellent contributions. I thought they were quite good and in keeping with my proposed issue and added a lot to the conversation.

It just seems that the popular consensus is that what I am asking cannot be done and to avoid disharmony I will not disagree with them .
 
Pia Jensen
Posts: 218
4
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Charles Kleff wrote:I apologize Pia, I didn't mean to suggest that your ideas were not excellent contributions. I thought they were quite good and in keeping with my proposed issue and added a lot to the conversation.

It just seems that the popular consensus is that what I am asking cannot be done and to avoid disharmony I will not disagree with them .


I understand, though I would just have kept plodding along...not worrying about how I felt about other's views until at least another week has passed.... or longer. Is conflict avoidance a permaculture thing?
 
Danielle Diver
Posts: 60
Location: Niort, France
14
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Maybe, Charles, since Permaculture is such a broad field, you could widdle your question into more specific topics. Chad had a great start (plant ID, urban foraging, bike repair, etc) take any one of those and ask the same question and you may get more concrete results.

for instance, i worked a lot with bike repair and hosted several bike repair classes i offered free to the pubilc. The host could buy a few basic tools (torx keys, tube repair kit, and a wrench) and show folks how to fix small repairs on their biycle. you'd be amazed how many people own a bike and cant change their own tube.

the list could go on and on.

i like your concept. i like the idea of exposing people to small hands-on diy activites (people LOVE that stuff) at the same time slipping in some permaculture propaganda. cant hurt anyway. and it invites new community conversation and creates partnerships. win win win situation.

im with Pia, keep going with this idea~
 
Pia Jensen
Posts: 218
4
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Danielle Diver wrote:i like your concept. i like the idea of exposing people to small hands-on diy activites (people LOVE that stuff) at the same time slipping in some permaculture propaganda. cant hurt anyway. and it invites new community conversation and creates partnerships. win win win situation.

im with Pia, keep going with this idea~


Cool... I was starting to think what a great way to create a "tool" for people who aren't familiar with permaculture to begin learning through 'snapshots' of easily do-able projects. Maybe a flip thru book, or a slideshow online of the different ideas... another way to expose people to permaculture... lots of people learn through subliminal orienteering...
 
Danielle Diver
Posts: 60
Location: Niort, France
14
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i was imagining the same sort of thing, Pia. I grew up flipping thru zines and that really was my first understanding of diy (before 'diy' was a 'thing'). each zine (handprinted magazine) focuses on a topic and educates the reader on this thing and that thing. i still have a great Herbal DIY zine that has traveled with me through the ages. free (or cheap), simple, easy to understand ideas and projects are what gets any idea cranking. when starting off in any new feild of exploration, we benefit from 'tinker toys' and projects and easy to absorb ideas in order to start digesting more complex ones.

Here are some $20 dollar projects i could imagine (related to my own world, there are literally thousands, millions? of ideas out there!)

- a backyard chicken tractor
- plant a tree and its guild
- potted garlic sprouts for window sills, or anything growing in window sills (i live in an apt in the center of town)
- a hundred different wild plants recipes
- god the list goes on, but really the question needs more focus. if i sit here in front of the screen too long my own projects will go to the wayside. Charles? do you have something more specific in mind? is this related to a project you are working on currently or one you would like it initiate soon? Is there a theme? do you have a particular area of interest or specialty? or is there something you want to learn about?

also, id like to note that the money part is a mental constraint because we all have access to free/cheap things at different times. if im hosting a workshop, i have a lot of confidence to go to a for profit store and ask for free donations (like my bike example, all those things i could easily get donated or borrow free from local bike shops) and offer them a sort of relaxed 'sponsorship' trade. stores LOVE that kind of community partnership. but not everyone is so outgoing. so if you are still headstrong on this topic, Charles, would it help to re-phrase the money part? it could be said that the monitary cap is at $20, but you could call it something more open like a Easy Skillz with Low Billz... or something smarter... that was just what i came up with off the top of my brainium.
 
chip sanft
Posts: 380
Location: 18 acres & heart in zone 4 (central MN). Current abode: Knoxville (zone 6 /7)
26
bike books dog
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One easily communicated permaculture concept might be, I think, closing loops. Something like showing the potentials of our "waste" by making it into something useful with minimal additions could show this. One possible project to communicate this could be:

1) Get some sproutable food waste, such as the rooty parts of scallions or leeks, the bottom of celery, basil or mint stems, etc. You could share a list of possibilities, as recognizing that these things are around us already would be part of the point.
Cost: zero, assuming someone will be eating something that will make the necessary starting point anyway. Or you could budget $3-6 to buy something with potential, eating the other part first.

2) Soak the sproutable stuff in water in a reused glass or food-grade plastic container until roots sprout.
Cost: functionally zero

3) Transfer to a reused container full of soil enriched with compost.
Cost: cheap to nothing, depending.

4) Let it grow. Add compost as necessary. Fertilize with diluted urine if you want a real permaculture lesson about making use of waste that modern societies generally treat as a problem.
Cost: cheap to nothing, depending.

5) Use the resulting food. Save the sproutable bits. Compost the rest, including the roots and the root-filled soil.

6) Repeat.
 
Thomas Partridge
Posts: 130
Location: Zone 7a
3
books chicken duck
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am loving the ideas and loving the desire to keep this train of thought going!

I really like the idea of it being in kit form if it has multiple products involved so they can just purchase the kit and try it out. We all have seen those little "grow your own herb garden" kits, something like that except maybe a "grow your own polyculture" kit.

The problem is that I am a novice when it comes to many of these things and I am still learning. It would have been so nice to have been able to go and get a "grow your own polyculture kit" as a teenager, try it out, and learn quite a bit for such a low risk. I think that the books, videos, and sites out there already do a great job providing information to people who know enough to look. I would just like to see more resources show up for people who have never even heard of things like permaculture and firmly believe you have to till soil and use chemicals to get food to grow. I think for this to happen more effort needs to be made in making these intros easy to use, affordable, and easily accessible.

Chip: So perhaps a video that shows a store bought leek (something from Walmart or any other big box store) having the very bottom cut off, soak until roots show in old plastic bottle, placed in a self watering planter made from a two liter bottle, a rag, and random fill dirt (found anywhere there is dirt). Maybe a list of sproutable produce that can be purchased from the store and reused can be found in a link on the video's comments?

Danielle: So many ideas to choose from! I love tree guilds and would love to see tree guilds that can be done with existing common trees so that people wouldn't have to wait for a tree they planted to grow to learn about tree guilds. Perhaps a video showing a common tree found in yards (such as an oak) and a guild of plants being planted around it? A link in the comment could link to a page with a list of those plants and links to amazon (or another online store) where they could purchase the seeds all for under $20?

Pia: Back to your idea with the willow, I am not very familiar with willows - how long from seed to a point where you could harvest branches for furniture making? It would be great to have a video that showed easy to make furniture using willow branches and then have a link where they can buy willow branches for really cheap. I understand this may take it over the $20 (by how much I am not sure - don't know how much willow branches would sell for) but perhaps small furniture projects could be thought of that would fit under the $20.

I am loving the way this conversation is going, lets keep it up and see if we can't make something really great!
 
chip sanft
Posts: 380
Location: 18 acres & heart in zone 4 (central MN). Current abode: Knoxville (zone 6 /7)
26
bike books dog
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Charles Kleff wrote:I am loving the ideas and loving the desire to keep this train of thought going!
Chip: So perhaps a video that shows a store bought leek (something from Walmart or any other big box store) having the very bottom cut off, soak until roots show in old plastic bottle, placed in a self watering planter made from a two liter bottle, a rag, and random fill dirt (found anywhere there is dirt). Maybe a list of sproutable produce that can be purchased from the store and reused can be found in a link on the video's comments?


I think that sounds great and very doable for pretty much anyone interested. My only thought would be, I might include one longer example (leeks, or maybe scallions just because they're familiar to everyone in North America), and perhaps some short clips showing other examples, too, to show what those could look like. I might also include at least mention of compost, though I can see why showing plain dirt would be important for keeping this accessible to a broad audience.
 
Thomas Partridge
Posts: 130
Location: Zone 7a
3
books chicken duck
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
chip sanft wrote:
I think that sounds great and very doable for pretty much anyone interested. My only thought would be, I might include one longer example (leeks, or maybe scallions just because they're familiar to everyone in North America), and perhaps some short clips showing other examples, too, to show what those could look like. I might also include at least mention of compost, though I can see why showing plain dirt would be important for keeping this accessible to a broad audience.


Exactly! Compost would be great, but I think that just to get them started it should be something they can have pretty much no way of messing up and they can get anywhere. Few people (if any) can't reasonably get a milk jug container filled with dirt from somewhere, but Joe Teenager might not be able to get the right compost to use.

That brings me to another thought, these $20 projects would be GREAT for teachers who have students who can't always afford really expensive materials and they certainly can't afford to buy the students kits for them. Wouldn't it be great if teachers started showing these things to children and teenagers when they were in school?
 
Zach Muller
gardener
Posts: 778
Location: NE Oklahoma zone 7a
36
bike books chicken dog forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You said you have a shovel and bucket. So here's a two part project idea for basically no money, just time and the shovel and bucket.

So part one of the project is seed saving and foraging. You take the bucket around and collect seeds. In my area right now is dandelions, and I could collect some redbud and maple seeds still clinging on as the new buds are coming in. I know of a place where there are standing sunflowers, dock, and Mullein from last season within walking distance of my house. This is a free activity, I'm not encouraging trespassing, I am speaking of public property.

Then part two is where you dig a small swale Where your downspout empties or where runoff enters your yard. Or anywhere there will be water really. Then plant your seeds.

Part three could be finding mulch to cover the top of the berm.

This project would show forage skill, plant Id, seed saving, seed processing, seed planting, swale basics, water storage, and mulch basics. The size of it could range from using a trowel and making a 1 foot demonstration swale, or a regular shovel and a 20 foot swale.



You mentioned doing these projects on a homestead so I assume you meant the cost of land would not be included in the budget constraint.
 
Thomas Partridge
Posts: 130
Location: Zone 7a
3
books chicken duck
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Zach Muller wrote:You said you have a shovel and bucket. So here's a two part project idea for basically no money, just time and the shovel and bucket.

So part one of the project is seed saving and foraging. You take the bucket around and collect seeds. In my area right now is dandelions, and I could collect some redbud and maple seeds still clinging on as the new buds are coming in. I know of a place where there are standing sunflowers, dock, and Mullein from last season within walking distance of my house. This is a free activity, I'm not encouraging trespassing, I am speaking of public property.

Then part two is where you dig a small swale Where your downspout empties or where runoff enters your yard. Or anywhere there will be water really. Then plant your seeds.

Part three could be finding mulch to cover the top of the berm.

This project would show forage skill, plant Id, seed saving, seed processing, seed planting, swale basics, water storage, and mulch basics. The size of it could range from using a trowel and making a 1 foot demonstration swale, or a regular shovel and a 20 foot swale.



You mentioned doing these projects on a homestead so I assume you meant the cost of land would not be included in the budget constraint.


I wouldn't consider the cost of the land in the $20 (since it is such a small project) but at the same time I would like to avoid projects that plant trees. Not because I am anti-tree, but because for the target audience that would require a great deal of patience. I would demonstrate them on my homestead if I could or on a relative's property with their permission if my homestead would not be ideal for the example. For a swale since my house has no downspout and we have yet to observe any water flowing (this could be an area where me being a novice is stifling my imagination) on the property I would likely have to use a relative's property for the demonstration. This is not a problem per se. Basic tools such as a shovel (could be replaced with a trowel for a few dollars) and a bucket would be included in the cost so we do need to keep an eye on those costs.

I like the idea of gathering a handful of common seeds that grow pretty much everywhere in the US and combining that with a easy to make swale to demonstrate both uses of swales and natural species. Unfortunately I know next to nothing about swales myself so I would have to research it quite a bit to get to the point where I was comfortable doing a video on it.
 
Zach Muller
gardener
Posts: 778
Location: NE Oklahoma zone 7a
36
bike books chicken dog forest garden urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Charles Kleff wrote:

Not because I am anti-tree, but because for the target audience that would require a great deal of patience. I would demonstrate them on my homestead if I could or on a relative's property with their permission if my homestead would not be ideal for the example. For a swale since my house has no downspout and we have yet to observe any water flowing (this could be an area where me being a novice is stifling my imagination) on the property I would likely have to use a relative's property for the demonstration. This is not a problem per se. Basic tools such as a shovel (could be replaced with a trowel for a few dollars) and a bucket would be included in the cost so we do need to keep an eye on those costs.

I like the idea of gathering a handful of common seeds that grow pretty much everywhere in the US and combining that with a easy to make swale to demonstrate both uses of swales and natural species. Unfortunately I know next to nothing about swales myself so I would have to research it quite a bit to get to the point where I was comfortable doing a video on it.


A lack of patience is what drives the frenzy to till and over manage nature in the first place to some degree, and it should be addressed gently but unceasingly.

Admittedly on second thought maybe my idea encompasses too much in one go.
For your own learning and ease of consumption for your audience you could break it up even further.

1. Learn to find contour with a simple homemade a frame ( piece of string, a weight and two sticks under 20 for sure, nearly free for most)
This would include why contour lines are important, their influence on runoff etc.

2. Forage and plant Id includes common plant types, poisonous lookalikes etc ( free, or maybe the cost of a library card, and a bus trip to local wilderness)

3. Seeds and seed saving would include seed types, common seed producing times, what to look for etc.

4. Seed planting, how to plant types of seeds, different methods like broadcasting, planting depth etc.

5. Eco systems and systems in general, this one is hard to make a specific activity other than just observation, but it is necessary in order to get to systems thinking, rather than just project thinking, this would breach the topic of where certain land features are useful, when compost is useful vs. use of an animal system. The activity could be something like just taking inventory of inputs and outputs of a household.

6. Simple swale or hugel demos done with hand shovel

7. Free mulch collecting and administering, would include how and why mulch is good, different types of naturally occurring mulches. Green manure concepts etc.

This way you have smaller bites to focus on and make little consumable episodes from.

As said before permaculture isn't really techniques. It's is a systematic way to do things, and people are allowed to fill in the technique aspects as they see fit for the site they are working on. It's important to get that system management aspect in there, or else a lot of people will implement a swale or hugel and call it a permaculture system, which its not. It is just one technique that can be used if you need it.

Pia wrote, " Is conflict avoidance a permaculture thing? " and I laughed out loud for some reason. But then thinking again, conflict avoidance is a permaculture thing, you want to avoid conflict with nature and find a way to work in concert with it(low energy expenditure) not against it(high energy expenditure).
 
Steve Farmer
Posts: 380
Location: South Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)
3
forest garden greening the desert trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Identify where the run off exits your property and build a check dam with as many rocks as $20 can buy. You will decrese erosion, gain biomass, replenish your groundwater and plantlife will benefit in the area without you doing anything else. Some of the benefits mght not apply to those who already have more than enough groundwater.
 
Pia Jensen
Posts: 218
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Zach Muller wrote:
Charles Kleff wrote: Pia wrote, " Is conflict avoidance a permaculture thing? " and I laughed out loud for some reason. But then thinking again, conflict avoidance is a permaculture thing, you want to avoid conflict with nature and find a way to work in concert with it(low energy expenditure) not against it(high energy expenditure).


yeah... I am so on that... it was a social interaction query... I am all for conflict avoidance among me and plants, they know way more than me... maybe because my brain got washed in political activities I come through a different door here... I have no issue with conflict among people... as long as the truth is found. So, I tend to keep plodding along, waiting for the truth to sprout, asking, prodding... not letting conflict get in the way of my quest.... I hope this makes sense.
 
Hester Winterbourne
Posts: 165
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b)
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How about:

Making a wormery to make use of kitchen peelings

Making a nest box or hibernaculum for garden wildlife

Sorry that is not very detailed, they are just ideas of what to do, not how to do it!
 
Liar, liar, pants on fire! refreshing plug:
paul's latest kickstarter
https://permies.com/t/65247/permaculture-design/permaculture-design-alternative-technology-live
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!