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Purslane and fruit trees?

 
Trish Fitzgerald
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Permie newbie here... Received a flat of flowering purslane as a gift, and I want to know... any pros or con's of planting them under my fruit trees? I've got Turkey fig, LSU fig, fuyu persimmon, 2 Chinese chestnuts, a Pakistan mulberry, and a Starks "Sweet Heart" edible nutted apricot, all brand-new this spring, and am in Dallas- zone 8a, with horrible Houston black clay that cracks in summer and cements boots together in 4" of muck in wet winter. For companion planting I found lots on their interaction with herbs & vegetables, but so far nothing on fruit trees. Thank you all in advance for any insights!!
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands
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Around here, I consider purslane to be a nasty weed, because it is the only weed that will re-root if it is severed from it's roots. That means that while weeding the vegetable garden, every bit of the plant has to be physically removed from the garden to prevent it from re-sprouting. So in my fields in which it is not already present, I am very diligent about making sure that it doesn't get started. I wash the tiller between fields, to reduce the chances of moving purslane seeds between fields.

 
Blake Wheeler
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Location: Kentucky 6b
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Pro: it's edible

Other than that I can't think of too many things it has going for it, or against it. Throw it in there and find out. I showed some around my raised bed and so far so good. Not bad tasting either
 
Cristo Balete
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Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
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Trish, these links have a few good things to say. Is it Dolly Parton?

http://www.ediblewildfood.com/purslane.aspx


http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/98promotions/april/april.html

The flowers will bring in beneficial insects. I've found some snails under it because it is a good ground cover, but going out early in the morning when snails are still on the loose makes it easy to find them. It won't like mucky soil, though.
 
Cristo Balete
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Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
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Trish, about the clay, the trick is to keep it covered with thick mulch, at least 6 inches deep. It will settle to about 3", and it keeps the sun off the clay, which is what dries it out and makes it crack. Clay has lots of minerals in it, which is good for us, and makes food and water taste better. The more mulch you put, crushed leaves, mowed grass, straw, it will amend your soil, you can use less water, the worms will come up into the thick mulch because it's damp. Once they show up you know you've got it at the right level. Clay will absorb that mulch for a long time, so don't let it disappear. Keep adding to it, make sure the soil is never exposed. It's easier to plant in, it becomes some of the best planting soil there is.
 
Trish Fitzgerald
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Thank you all for the information- looks like as with every living thing, there're upsides and downsides to purslane. And my mulch-less clay definitely needs attention! The purslane is some improved variety, though not named on the tags, and these guys wake up at 7am instead of doing the regular Dolly Parton 9-to-5! I think I will chance a few of them in one small area that is surrounded by Bermuda grass, and see how that works this year. The rest of them are going into one of the Aggie recipes... Purslane omelette... mmmmmm...
 
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