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Help with propagating passion flower!  RSS feed

 
Amir Salvatore
Posts: 31
Location: North Carolina
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Hello! I was shocked to find a 5ft tall passion flower along a main road, just under a metal guardrail. I'm guessing a bird pooped the seeds out there a year or so ago!

I kinda rushed from excitement, and tried to pull the plant from the root by "twisting" the plant at it's base in circles. This usually has worked for me before to remove a stubborn plant, but this time it didn't. The plant snapped off at the base of the root. I understand this is a vine, so maybe the roots are different? Will this plant still propagate? Should I cut off the new growth and propagate that separately?

Currently the plant is in some soil. The plant also had one other side shoot growing on it, which I cut and am propagating in soil too. I put honey on it as a rooting agent, not sure that'll do anything, but it's all I got. Anyways, any input would be helpful!
 
Joylynn Hardesty
Posts: 199
Location: Officially Zone 7a, nearer 6b, SW Tennessee
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My experience...
While visiting friends, I admired her passion flowers dotting the pastures, "Do you want some?" Why, of course! How could you ask such a thing?
As we continued to wander the property, she delegated the digging to the kids. I would have been a bit more careful, myself, but hey, free.
They dug up 20ish, most of which had broken roots. We put them in a Wallmart bag with just enough soil to cover up the roots, ran water over them to ensure dampness, and parked them in the shade. For 3 hours until I left. Then I threw the bag of plants in the trunk, and drove for 2 1/2 hours. Since I have insufficient skill to balance a flashlight whiled digging holes, I left them in the bag, but not in the trunk. The next day I found out I was out of potting soil AND pots. Ooops. So I plopped them in the damp dirt under the blackberry bushes. They were planted sometime before noon.
I don't have the precise survival rate, as I didn't mark each one, but enough made it through the experience to make me happy. I think they are fairly forgiving plants.

Caution: I now tend to take the attitude of plant enough of X and some will survive. I was getting way too stressed over the survival rate of my plants.
 
John Elliott
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Get yourself a good sized shovel and dig it out by the root. If you get your spade under the main part of the root, you may be able to lift out a good size piece of the vining root with it. That it what the plant will grow from.

I dug two plants out of the ditch up the road at the end of last summer. They both suffered from transplant shock after I moved them and looked dead, but one started to put out new leaves about a month later. That one overwintered and is now growing, albeit slowly. I think the best time to try and dig them out is right after a heavy rain. I didn't try digging them after they went dormant in winter; I figured I would try it again during the growing season this year.
 
Amir Salvatore
Posts: 31
Location: North Carolina
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Joylynn Hardesty wrote:My experience...
While visiting friends, I admired her passion flowers dotting the pastures, "Do you want some?" Why, of course! How could you ask such a thing?
As we continued to wander the property, she delegated the digging to the kids. I would have been a bit more careful, myself, but hey, free.
They dug up 20ish, most of which had broken roots. We put them in a Wallmart bag with just enough soil to cover up the roots, ran water over them to ensure dampness, and parked them in the shade. For 3 hours until I left. Then I threw the bag of plants in the trunk, and drove for 2 1/2 hours. Since I have insufficient skill to balance a flashlight whiled digging holes, I left them in the bag, but not in the trunk. The next day I found out I was out of potting soil AND pots. Ooops. So I plopped them in the damp dirt under the blackberry bushes. They were planted sometime before noon.
I don't have the precise survival rate, as I didn't mark each one, but enough made it through the experience to make me happy. I think they are fairly forgiving plants.

Caution: I now tend to take the attitude of plant enough of X and some will survive. I was getting way too stressed over the survival rate of my plants.


Awesome story! Glad to hear yours made it, hopefully mine do!

John Elliott wrote:Get yourself a good sized shovel and dig it out by the root. If you get your spade under the main part of the root, you may be able to lift out a good size piece of the vining root with it. That it what the plant will grow from.

I dug two plants out of the ditch up the road at the end of last summer. They both suffered from transplant shock after I moved them and looked dead, but one started to put out new leaves about a month later. That one overwintered and is now growing, albeit slowly. I think the best time to try and dig them out is right after a heavy rain. I didn't try digging them after they went dormant in winter; I figured I would try it again during the growing season this year.


Thanks for your sharing your experience as well! Unfortunately I already severed the plant from the root it was on a major road, and it felt weird to just start digging to china out of no where with a shovel, though I should have at least dug a bit with the scissors... oh well Maybe the main plant doesn't make it? I still have a good cutting from it, and there was a smaller plant next to it growing that I pulled up, so maybe I'll have some luck!(:
 
Roberta Wilkinson
Posts: 174
Location: Washington Timber Country
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I successfully rooted a passion vine cutting in a jar of plain water, so I think they're pretty willing rooters. Fingers crossed!

Any chance you have some willow around that you could use to make a rooting solution to water the cuttings with?
 
Amir Salvatore
Posts: 31
Location: North Carolina
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Roberta Wilkinson wrote:I successfully rooted a passion vine cutting in a jar of plain water, so I think they're pretty willing rooters. Fingers crossed!

Any chance you have some willow around that you could use to make a rooting solution to water the cuttings with?


Fingers crossed indeed! The cutting off the main vine I took is currently in water, so hopefully that works!

I do not have any willow near by, will anything else work as a rooting solution? Sea weed maybe?
 
John Elliott
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Amir Salvatore wrote:
I do not have any willow near by, will anything else work as a rooting solution?


Oh, there has to be some growing in your neighborhood. Just pull over, leave the engine running, and snip a few branches.

it was on a major road, and it felt weird to just start digging to china out of no where with a shovel


Oh pshaw, you're already an eccentric by being a Permie, what's a little more digging on a public right-of-way going to do? Now excuse me while I go take some more cuttings from up the road and see if I can get them to root.
 
Amir Salvatore
Posts: 31
Location: North Carolina
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John Elliott wrote:
Amir Salvatore wrote:
I do not have any willow near by, will anything else work as a rooting solution?


Oh, there has to be some growing in your neighborhood. Just pull over, leave the engine running, and snip a few branches.

it was on a major road, and it felt weird to just start digging to china out of no where with a shovel


Oh pshaw, you're already an eccentric by being a Permie, what's a little more digging on a public right-of-way going to do? Now excuse me while I go take some more cuttings from up the road and see if I can get them to root.


haha, gotta admit, I need to be a little less stiff with my ways! Wish I had someone with your mindset around, I'd get a lot more done with experimenting around my garden! I should've just dug down and got the root darn it! As for a willow, I will have to look around! I'm sure there's one around somewhere, just probably never noticed it!

In the mean time, any other rooting agents? or will just water be fine?
 
Joylynn Hardesty
Posts: 199
Location: Officially Zone 7a, nearer 6b, SW Tennessee
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"Oh, there has to be some growing in your neighborhood. Just pull over, leave the engine running, and snip a few branches."

Maybe 2 or so years ago, my neighbor snatched some weeping willow from a parking lot landscape. He parked it in the ground with a T post next to it. It's now over 6" tall. Pretty.
 
John Elliott
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Roberta Wilkinson wrote:I successfully rooted a passion vine cutting in a jar of plain water, so I think they're pretty willing rooters. Fingers crossed!

Any chance you have some willow around that you could use to make a rooting solution to water the cuttings with?


Just an update. After my last comment I went up the street to snip 3 pieces for rooting and I dug up two plants. I didn't have any luck with the 3 cuttings, but I was able to keep the two plants alive, even though it has been hotter and drier than normal this month.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
Posts: 199
Location: Officially Zone 7a, nearer 6b, SW Tennessee
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Hurrah!!
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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