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What is this weed? SW Michigan

 
Andy Johnson
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Hi, I have a stubborn weed in my blueberry field. I would like to know what it is so I can find better ways of managing it. Maybe there is even a use for it. Does any one recognize this thing? The picture doesn't show it but in the fall it gets a cluster of bulb like formations at the top kind of like a chive/onion. It doesn't smell like anything and is VERY hard to pull out or cut.
worst-weed.jpg
[Thumbnail for worst-weed.jpg]
 
Joylynn Hardesty
Posts: 154
Location: Officially Zone 7a, nearer 6b, SW Tennessee
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The foreground has some dead remains that remind me of bulrush. Is the area frequently wet?
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Scirpus+microcarpus
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Mike Turner
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Location: Upstate SC
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Soft rush or common rush (Juncus effusus) native throughout the world in damp locations.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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That looks more like it, Mike!

 
Andy Johnson
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Thanks everyone. From what you all posted I think it's a rush too. It's only in the wet areas of my land. I guess I can use it as an indicator for growing plants that need lots of water. Any other uses you can think of?
 
Joylynn Hardesty
Posts: 154
Location: Officially Zone 7a, nearer 6b, SW Tennessee
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"...is VERY hard to pull out or cut"
"Any other uses you can think of"

With the stubborn roots, it will help prevent erosion. I have used rushes as mulch, but I don't have many plants.
There are references of using rushes for baskets. Try cutting it with pruners.
 
Craig Dobbson
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Location: Maine (zone 5)
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You could use them to make rush lights, an alternative to candles. They are made by soaking the rush in heated animal fats and then hanging them up to dry/harden. I first saw it done on the show Tales from the Green Valley I don't remember what episode it was so here is a you tube link to full playlist

You can also see rush lights being made here.



Not as good as a candle but better than nothing.

 
Andy Johnson
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Craig Dobbelyu wrote:You could use them to make rush lights, an alternative to candles. They are made by soaking the rush in heated animal fats and then hanging them up to dry/harden. I first saw it done on the show Tales from the Green Valley I don't remember what episode it was so here is a you tube link to full playlist

You can also see rush lights being made here.



Not as good as a candle but better than nothing.


Wow, that is one creative use!
 
Chadwick Holmes
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Location: Volant, PA
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Rushes are also used to aid in tuning bagpipes by taking up space in the bore.....silly rush fact!
 
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