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Photos of permaculture gardens etc

 
suez Cawood
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Isn't there a thread with pictures of permaculture gardens.  I would love to see more.
A picture speaks a thousand words..........

Suzie
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9445
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Here's a picture of my little garden from a couple months ago:



Plants in this garden include apple trees, elderberry, daylilies, elephant garlic, garlic, walking onions, summer squash, cucumbers, melons, green beans, fava beans, echinacea, mexican primrose, native sunflowers, englemann daisy,basil, oregano, culinary sage, mullein, parsley, carrots, eggplant, okra, basketflower, jerusalem artichoke, zinnia.
 
Robert Ray
gardener
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Location: Cascades of Oregon
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This summer has been so busy I haven't been able to spend as much time as I normally do in the garden and greenhouse. Here is a picture from a hoop house that shows asparagus in the back in its fern stage and a squash plant covering the ground. I plant potatoes in the green house in early April so I have new potatoes by the fourth of July but this year I let a small batch of  French fingerlings go and you see them in the foreground. What you don't see are the carrots that are under the squash leaves and will continue to grow into the winter months after the squash vine dies back.
hoop house.JPG
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Travis Philp
gardener
Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
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The first picture gives a sense of the majority of the house garden. It is all no-till, save for one bed which was chicken tractored and then forked and clawed to loosen it. Most beds are keyholes, and we try to plant at least two crops at a time in each bed, leaving space for wild plants to come in too... Lambs quarters is one of our best selling crops.

The second pic is a little messy but its a mandala thats around 30 feet wide. There is a young plum tree, globe artichoke, squash, leek and lambs quarters in the middle, surrounded by squash, peppers, radish, and random volunteer plants.

The peppers were planted about 2 feet apart, and the squash was planted about 2 feet apart along the inside and outside edges of the mandala. The squash needed a bit of retraining and pruning of leaves in order to give the peppers enough sunlight, and I should've added more height to the bed but it's still working pretty decently overall.

The bed was made by laying down about 10-12 inches of hay,  making planting holes for the squash and pepper, and filling those with a manure soil mix. For the radish, I just dumped soil on top of the hay in 2 inch wide strips, waited for a good rain to wash the soil in, and planted the radish. I should've added manure to the soil as the radish aren't doing that great. They did well enough to make a lot of radish chips though, and were mainly a soil improver and trap crop to protect the squash.

The third picture shows tomatoes and broccoli in the forground. What you can't see is the lettuce planted in hte shade of the tomatoes, the leeks and celery planted in with the broccoli, and the celery, cauliflower, artichoke, tomato, kohlrabi, leek and kale mandala in the background

The fourth picture is pretty self explanitory if you look at the picture title.
tom grndchrry eggplnt longshot.jpg
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squash pepper radish plum longshot mandala.jpg
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tomato celery broccoli.jpg
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squash tomato kohlrabi radish keyhole.jpg
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Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
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well we are having a bad drought here in Michigan ..at least our area..but i did walk around and snap some photos today..here is a link to one album with 10 photos

http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=26836&id=1846485863&l=b6e344ec44

and on the general homesteading forum i have another link to more photos in the thread about the worst drought we have ever had..those are of the work we have started to do on our pond, as it has gone about 80 % dry.
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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great photos everyone
 
Glenn Kangiser
pollinator
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Location: Central California
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That garden looks gigantic, Travis.  I was not aware that things grew that well in the great white north.
 
suez Cawood
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Tks for the photos.  Great to see all the beautiful gardens.
It's our first year and our first spring is coming, so I'll add my photos as soon as anything starts growing.  Keep em photos coming please.  I love seeing what can be done.

Suzie
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 383
Location: South West France
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Here's a set of photos from our zone one potager which I'm still in the process of planting :

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/hardworkinghippy/sets/72057594064739567/
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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nice photos..zone 1, is that zone 1  because it is close to the house such as permaculture zones..or zone 1..as it is really cold type zone 1??
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
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Location: South West France
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Hi Brenda,

Sorry, I meant zone 1 close to the house as in permaculture zones !

We're in climate zone 7/8.
 
Travis Philp
gardener
Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
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Glenn Kangiser wrote:
That garden looks gigantic, Travis.  I was not aware that things grew that well in the great white north.


It gets pretty hot and humid here in the late spring and through the summer. Temperatures are mid to high 20's on average with a high humidity once summer is in full swing, unless you're talking about the coastal provinces.

We can grow just about any vegetable round these parts. Short season sweet potatoes do well, I've had cucumbers in september, I can even get artichokes to fruit in the first year and grow them as perennials.
 
Lisa Paulson
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Brenda,    I was noticing even here in the Pacific Northwest we have not had much  for rain in three months and I am planting and aiming to have my land emulate a mixed treed and meadow areas.  What do you notice as far as how your property is handling the drought compared to other areas around yours?
Are you watering  much of anything?
As it gets established is the work less intensive?
I think it looks amazing  : )
 
Glenn Kangiser
pollinator
Posts: 236
Location: Central California
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Travis Philp wrote:
It gets pretty hot and humid here in the late spring and through the summer. Temperatures are mid to high 20's on average with a high humidity once summer is in full swing, unless you're talking about the coastal provinces.

We can grow just about any vegetable round these parts. Short season sweet potatoes do well, I've had cucumbers in september, I can even get artichokes to fruit in the first year and grow them as perennials.


Well I have to say that your garden is a real beauty.  I'm here on the edge of the San Joaquin valley and wish mine looked as good.  Short on water for now but working on it and working on the techniques I am learning here to increase retained groundwater and hopefully improve things - thanks for the great pix.
 
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