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ID my forest shroom ?

 
Miles Flansburg
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I had a bunch of these last year but didn't have a camera. Some of them were up to about 10 inches across.
The undersides are more spongy looking than veined but that may change over time?
Any guesses?
Edible?

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Meryt Helmer
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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is the top slimy? I have some that look like that here with slimy caps I am told not to eat them and we have ones with non slimy caps I am told are a type of bolete and edible and very good but I only find ones with slimy caps so far. someone who knows more will probably post! I think it is a type of or related to bolete and don't eat it unless someone can give you a very positive idea preferably who sees it in person!
 
Meryt Helmer
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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i think that spongy underside is because they are polypore!
 
Rose Pinder
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Location: Otago, New Zealand
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I would call that a bolete (boletus, suillus etc spp). A great shroom to have around if it's one of the edible ones. However you don't want to be guessing with mushrooms, mistakes can be fatal or extremely hazardous to health. There are toxic boletes. Below are some resources to help you get started on identifying edible vs poisonous, but it's not something you should do in a hurry (don't rush to be eating this crop for instance, unless you are sure of the ID). If you have someone locally who can positively ID them, that's better.


http://www.mushroomexpert.com/suillus.html

http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Mushrooms.Folder/Bolete%20Overview.html
 
Miles Flansburg
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Thanks all ! Ya I would not eat any untill I was absolutely sure of it's edibility. I don't think it was slimmy, I will have to check on that.

One of the links had this to say : Suillus subaureus : Found primarily under quaking aspen and big-toothed aspen; cap margin with a roll of whitish material when young; stem with glandular dots by maturity, not reticulate.

My land is mostly aspens so this would fit in.
 
John Saltveit
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I would use David Arora's Mushrooms Demystified, and use the key. I concur that it is probably a bolete. If you think you know what it is, you can look at Google Images, but always confirm with another source afterwards, like mushroom expert. com.
John S
PDX OR
 
Alex Veidel
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Ha! First thing that jumped to my mind was bolete as well. Glad to find out all those mushroom books I read a while back did something for me
 
steve bossie
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i have them up here in maine under my aspen. the aspen bolete isn't poisonous but doesn't have any taste either. Ive tried them.
 
leila hamaya
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the thing with boletes (thats definitely what you have there) is that they are so easy to identify because of that sponge under the cap.

while there are a few that are not considered edible, most of that genus are edible. and the ones which arent edible are more the- minor stomache distress causing non edible - rather than the crazy scary fatal types of non edibles.
 
John Saltveit
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If I recall correctly, you definitely want to stay away from red spore prints and blue bruising. If you find those, don't eat them.
JohN S
PDX OR
 
M.K. Dorje Jr.
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Location: Orgyen, zone 8
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The Aspen Bolete (Leccinum insigne group) is commonly found under aspen:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leccinum_insigne

Maybe that's what you have...


 
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