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cedar rust and hazlenut guilds..... 2 separate questions

 
wendy Shairs
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cedar or quince rust.....on 3 apples and a quince....any suggestions?

how much space do you need for a hazelnut guild with 2 trees? and what would you suggest go with them?
 
Ken W Wilson
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I have native hazel bushes that only get about 6 ' tall. I have thornless blackberries between some of them. The hazels are about 15 ' apart but could probably be 10' or less and still have good berry plants between them. I'm not sure if they are helping each other or not, but they are doing fine.

I have a couple named varieties of hazel trees. They're 3-4 years old and have hardly grown at all. I'm hoping they're making good roots
 
Bryant RedHawk
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wendy Shairs wrote:cedar or quince rust.....on 3 apples and a quince....any suggestions?

how much space do you need for a hazelnut guild with 2 trees? and what would you suggest go with them?


How close are the cedar trees and how many are there?
where are they in relation to the prevailing winds?
Does the quince have the same looking rust spots as the apple trees?
With out knowing the answers to those questions, I really can't give good advice on rust prevention, cure methods.

Hazelnut trees should be a minimum of 15' between trunks (20' is better), this spacing goes for any number of hazelnut trees, the spacing is measured in all directions.
just about any shallow rooting crop plants will do fine in a nut orchard as long as you maintain the tree drip lines as the borders of the plantings.
 
Ken W Wilson
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I've been thinking of adding false indigo and possibly using it for chop and drop, maybe just letting it grow. Maybe plums around the edges. I'm new to the guild idea and just making it up as I go along. I've been doing edible landscaping for a long time.Just working with a yard for now, so I want everything to have a purpose. Just starting shopping for some woods.
 
Pete Lundy
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Location: east central indiana
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I planted some hazels this year. My companion plants were aronia bushes and hardy pecan trees.
I live in Indiana. Our DNR has a program were you can buy some nursery stock of native trees and
shrubs on the cheep. They have all grown nicely. Did I mention they were about $50 for 100
specimens. I didn't get every one plants this spring. I'm trying to reforest about 2 acres around my
house. The hazels are c. americana I think. No blight, but small nuts. Plan to get some european
hybrid at some point to see how they do.
 
Ken W Wilson
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Bryant, I've read that you can plant hazel nuts very close for a hedge. Are you saying this isn't right or maybe it depends on the type of hazel nut?

What are hazel roots like? Do they stay shallow or go deep? Do they stay mostly under the drip line? I have a raised bed about six feet from mine.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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hau Ken, the spacing I mentioned is for a "working" orchard set up where you want maximum production and ease of harvesting.

Yes you can use Hazels for a hedge row and still get nuts, just not as many (which may fit well for you, depends on if your trying to market the crop or have it for self use).
I've seen one of these that the owner did a weaving pattern of the branches, then came back and debraided the bark where the weave overlapped. The bark of both branches then fused and it was remarkable looking. He told me he had done it over a three year period and did the fusing because he noticed some branches were fusing on their own and he liked the look.

Hazel roots go down about 18" then spread out. Feeder roots will end about half the tree spread past the drip line.
In almost all trees the drip line is where the majority of feeder roots are found, hence it being the best place for watering and feeding.
Once a tree is fully established (growing well and adding major branches) just about anything can be planted under it as long as the roots are 1. shallow (top 8" to 12") and 2. are not planted right up against the trunk (I like a 6 inch diameter bare space).
As always, keeping the soil covered (grasses, brassicas, legumes, etc.) helps with holding moisture and keeping the soil organisms thriving.
In our orchard we use raised beds between the trees so the tree roots are not disturbed by our vegetables.
 
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