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In bed composting

 
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For lack of time right now I am just burying my kitchen scraps a bucket at a time in places I plan to plan in later. What are the biggest drawbacks to this other than the obvious lack of big diversity in materials composted?
 
pollinator
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The only drawback I have experienced is varmints digging the "treats" up....
 
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Location: west marin, bay area california. sandy loam, well drained, acidic soil and lots of shade
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I second it being dug up
in my backyard that is called "party time"

but I do something like that with some 5 gallon buckets. i drilled holes in them got screw on lids and bury them with just the top sticking out. i add in some compost worms and worm bedding and that is where some of our kitchen scraps grow. I like to put these near fruit trees or tree collards and I don't seem to need to really do anything to maintain them. it took some trial and error to get the moisture and everything worked out right and in the beginning a few times i had to pull a bucket out and remix the contents with some dryer stuff but once i get them balanced the worms are moving their castings out of the buckets and the plants near them are are putting roots around the buckets and I now have a nice worm population in the mulch where I had none before because where I live there are lots of things that love to eat worms!
 
Tyler Ludens
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I have more or less solved the digging problem by making a big rock pile over the buried stuff. Lizards like these rock piles, which get moved around the garden rather slowly, as we don't generate much material that needs to be buried.

 
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I'm a big fan of burying. No real drawbacks other than the varmints - and on the upside, no turning, mixing, watering, etc. The plants will find the nutrition when they want it.
 
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Location: Otago, New Zealand
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Do you mix anything else in, or just the kitchen scraps?
 
Marilyn Nugent
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So far just kitchen scraps. Then I cover with newspaper and wood chips that I got from a tree guy and I let it age for a while. I am building bed areas kind of a square foot at a time.
 
David Good
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Excellent.

I've buried meat, kitchen waste, paper, hot manure, eggshells, bones and all kinds of stuff in the garden... the yields just get better and better.
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