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Any advise on how to build a bog-true peat bog?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 618
Location: Volant, PA
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Anyone here have any direction or advice for someone who wants to build a long term peat bog?

This does not seem to be a popular thing to build, looking for books or any instructional materials at all.

Thanks
 
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Location: Virginia,USA zone 6
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You'll need tons and tons of moss. The they must be deposited in a wetland area and allow to decompose anaerobically.
Google scholar might help.
https://scholar.google.com/schhp?hl=en


http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/0012-9615%282006%29076%5B0299%3ABTLTPB%5D2.0.CO%3B2
 
Chadwick Holmes
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You got the right idea, I want the peat to grow there to create a living bog, one that will reproduce itself and continue making its own moss.
 
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Hello Chadwick,

If you would like, I can take you through the parameters of "inoculating" an area to create a bog with peat moss and related species that makeup these biome types. I designed vivarium and related habitats at one time for zoos/nature centers etc. I still dabble in Orchidacea terrarium, and small vivarium for reptiles, amphibians and other small animals. This (I am assuming?) is outside and would resemble something we built for spotted and bog turtles.

Do you want this to be an "all natural" peat bog" or something that may use materials like pond liner or related items? Also how big an area, and do you have a naturally wet area already in mind for this?

It would also help (I know you're in PA) if you could harvest some local species to transplant into your system?

Regards,

j
 
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Bog plants and creatures are legally protected in many areas. Check with the appropriate authority. Sometimes, things can be gathered from areas that are being developed. It could be a salvage operation.
 
Chadwick Holmes
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Dale, is that an ag extension endeavor you recon?

Jay C , anything you got on inoculating a peat bog, I'd love to hear it.

Just so we are all on the same page, I am 100% Irish, i love the bogs and moors, plus I see land as generational resourse development, and a peat bog can provide heat when trees are no longer, call it worst case insurance. Worst case being British navy cut all your trees for ships, or blight. ( I'm not a end is nigh guy) plus it's a great carbon bank.... So I'm interested in a late succession solid mass bog not a wetland area that has a lot of open water, as my goal.

I'm no scientist, so try to keep it on lay terms, I don't enjoy wordiness, I try to get to a given destination by the simplest route that is effective.
 
Dale Hodgins
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The Irish habit of cutting out their peat and burning it,  is something born of desperation. 100 years ago, Ireland had only about 1% tree cover. It's now over 2% and up to 10% depending on the source, but still one of the lowest in the Europe. Ireland's record of forest destruction and then burning of the soil,  is not something worth emulating. Haiti is the only other place I can think of that has done such a poor job with their forests. Things have really turned around in the last century. The government has set a goal of 17% forest cover. Hedgerows are also encouraged by various grants.

 A standing crop of trees,  is a much more efficient way to produce fuel wood. I doubt that much would come of a man-made bog in under 1000 years.
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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I read you loud and clear Dale on the "legal part" and agree. In this case, I am sure it is an acceptable practice as I use to live in Gettysburg, as long as things like Lady Slipper Orchids and few others aren't harmed (but I think some harvest transplanting is allowed?) I agree, check the regs.

As for a "bog" to produce "cutting peat" for fuel...I think the number is over 15000 years. I know it take a very long time just to start to get something established and of fuel value and that is measure in many millenia.

As for just having "bog" I love them too!!! They are awesome, and have much more than just the peat. Orchids, iris, fern, and all manner of "wee beasty" plus the fringe is great for blueberry, and related species...

To get started...Is the a "wet spot" in the area that this is planned for??
 
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Chadwick Holmes wrote:Dale, is that an ag extension endeavor you recon?



Ag extension might have that information, but your best bet would probably be the PA Dept. of Environmental Protection or PA Bureau of Forestry.
 
Chadwick Holmes
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No,no, fellas I don't want to actually cut the peat, it's just something that means a lot to me and a great carbon bank, things would have to be bad for my future people for that to work, but I had to explain what my definition of bog is...many think of a cattail shallow as a bog, some just a swampy place.


Ireland was almost all forest except the windy coasts, Irish oak was a great wood, it made the British naval system what it was, and it still lines the interior of royal buildings all over London. Ireland did not do a bad job at taking care of forests, their Bronze Age took care of some and their greedy niebor finished the job. One was Viking tool manufacture one was British wood greed. Anyway, I know Irish history, quite well, and am an Uilleann piper.

Irish oak by the way....extinct. But I believe it to be a southern live oak carried by the jet stream, and evoloved to suit Ireland's cool wet climate rather than a hot wet one of our southern states. Just a theory.

Ok, so, I want major water holding capacity, more than Swales will provide, but I don't care for ponds, hence the bog, major water in the landscape and carbon being held as well! Win win!
 
A berm makes a great wind break. And Iwe all like to break wind once in a while. Like this tiny ad:
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