Win a copy of For the Love of Paw Paws this week in the Fruit Trees forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Pipe for a wood stove

 
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I built a small wood burning stove for my shed. I have 4" single wall galv pipe from the stove all the way through the roof. Where it goes up through the ceiling, I put a fiberglass wrap that was designed to go around hot pipe. I have used it like this for 2 winters now. I am in SC, so it is usually used on the weekends. I never felt really safe with the way I installed it, and am worried about it getting too hot and failing, and I want to make a change. But all that double wall, and triple wall pipe is so expensive! I want to know if I can put a 4" steel pipe that is 6' long in place of the single wall thin stove pipe? The new steel pipe is .120 thickness, about 1/8 inch sidewall thick. The pipe would not be near any wood going through the roof. And I thought for extra protection, I would also put the fiberglass wrap on the pipe where it goes up through the roof. I can buy this pipe new for a fraction of the cost of stove pipe. I don't see this new pipe getting red hot and blowing through and failing. I have searched and searched the net for any info on this but cannot find any. I stumbled onto your forum while I was looking. Any info would be greatly appreciated! MrRantek24.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1524
Location: northern California
150
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think it depends on what the stovepipe is going through on its way outside. If it's going through metal roofing, and there's a good distance between the penetration point and anything combustible like wooden studs, then as you have it is probably fine. But if it's going through a wooden ceiling, insulation, or such like, that's where the double/triple wall pipes are best. It just has to be the section that actually penetrates the other layers.....having single wall pipe inside the living space actually radiates more heat into the space.
The other danger is in the event of a stovepipe fire, the thicker the material the less likely it will be to buckle or melt or otherwise fail before the fire goes out. But hopefully you are inspecting and sweeping out your pipe regularly and preventing even getting close to this point.....
 
Randy Hilton
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi there, thank you for your input. Where the stove pipe meets the ceiling, I have metal there, not wood. I do not have any insulation in the ceiling. The pipe does go between studs, that's why I had the fiberglass insulation wrapped around the single wall pipe. The fiberglass insulation is about 1" thick and is made to slide over the 4" pipe. I have the proper flashing on the roof and the pipe extends out about 3'. I figured the solid steel pipe 1/8 thick would really hold up in case of a chimney fire. That's why I am leaning towards using it. The thin galv stove pipe scared me and would turn red sometimes, and I thought it might just burn right through it. So it's time for a change!! LOL! MrRantek24
 
Posts: 3375
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
37
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Will it be code? Probably not. Is it safer than what you have? YES!!! Galvanized is horribly dangerous.

Keep the clearance to combustible materials as far as you can and use heat shields where you can.
 
He's giving us the slip! Quick! Grab this tiny ad!
A rocket mass heater is the most sustainable way to heat a conventional home
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!