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Plant identification

 
Posts: 74
Location: London, Ontario, Canada - zone 6a
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This perennial, ground cover-ish plant grows in my garden but I don't know what it is, or what it does. Can anyone please help me identify it? The leaves are a bit lighter than usual because of the frost we had recently, usually they are a more vibrant green.

Thanks in advance Permies,

Your expertise, (and the other people's expertise that went into making not only this machine, but the network and systems it talks over are almost scary to think about.... go humans!),

Amjad
20151019_133821.jpg
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Posts: 1390
Location: Northwest Montana from Zone 3a to 4b (multiple properties)
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It looks like some kind of purslane to me. I found this link to a North Carolina State University website that looks similar and calls it pink purslane. Mine here in Montana has rounded lobes, which is what threw me.

http://turfid.ncsu.edu/csPagedPdField.aspx?PlantID=PORPI
 
gardener
Posts: 787
Location: NE Oklahoma zone 7a
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That is exactly what i was thinking bill, but the pointed leaves threw me too. If it had yellow flowers Tipped in pink i might guess portulaca umbraticola, but i am not sure. Does this plant have noticeable flowers ever? How succulent are the leaves if at all?
 
Amjad Khan
Posts: 74
Location: London, Ontario, Canada - zone 6a
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I broke one of the leaves and it was succulent, which is a new term for me, thank you for teaching me this as well as helping me with the ID.
Edit: You asked how succulent: I don't know how to describe it, but it was pretty similar to the inside of an aloe plant, with that clear gel inside, just not nearly as fat.

OK I also looked at purslane and I don't think what I have is purslane.

I should have mentioned that the plant in question is an ornamental that someone else planted in three different spots in the garden, and it hasn't spread from there. Also it has no vertical growth at all. It just sprawls on the ground, and I've never seen it flower in two years.

It doesn't grow very fast, and doesn't do much that I can see...
 
Bill Erickson
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Location: Northwest Montana from Zone 3a to 4b (multiple properties)
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Amjad, I'm still mostly convinced it is purslane, most likely one of the tropical varieties for the reasons you have stated - low growth, no real spreading, and no flowering. They prefer it very hot and dry, which I don't think is true for the climate in your area. The common purslane goes crazy out here in Montana, but we have very hot and dry summers.
I'd lay odds that if you were to chop up the plant in your garden, that you would have a few more than three plants next year.

You do know for sure that it is a succulent, which one it could be is the interesting thing.
 
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Location: Massachusetts
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Amjad Khan
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Location: London, Ontario, Canada - zone 6a
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Susan Doyon wrote:looks like a sedium http://www.joenesgarden.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/sedum-ground-cover-2.jpg


Thank you Susan, Bill and Zach. From a google search I think it might be a sedum, they are an extremely diverse set of plants from the looks of it.

The best match is in your picture, Susan, but I wasn't able to find a similar picture to the ones we have here on google.

Interesting fact: this plant is commonly used as a roof cover, and according to Wikipedia, "Nintendo of America's roof is covered in some 75,000 square feet of Sedum."
 
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