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Dunwoody, Georgia (Suburban Permaculture)  RSS feed

 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
books food preservation urban
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My small suburban garden is located in Dunwoody, a city bordering Atlanta, Georgia. I've been gardening on this 3/4 acre site for nearly 20 years and have gained much knowledge through experience, education and community. Over the last several years I have become fascinated with permaculture and can't seem to get enough of it. I enjoy visiting public and private gardens, homesteads and organic farms. I read all things permaculture and digest as many Youtube videos about it as I can. I'm interested in meeting people in my area with a similar passion for permaculture, and I'm wondering if anyone nearby would like to get acquainted and share ideas?
 
Virginia Ratliff
Posts: 43
Location: Bartow County GA
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I am north of Atlanta and am becoming an avid student of "all things permaculture"! And, now I am finding myself in need of conversation with some "like minded souls"! I have one acre in a residential neighborhood close enough to walk to Lake Allatoona, I have rabbits, 3 raised beds and 2 hugelkulture beds...now my goal has become to turn our yard into a food forest. So, I have this "blank canvas" before me and want all the input I can find to help this be not only a very nutritious and productive yard but beautiful also! I wanted to get at least some apple trees planted this fall but a 30 year old roof has take priority for right now...we are replacing shingles with tin and installing new gutters and huge rain barrels! I am so excited! That gives me all winter to find my trees...any favorite local nurseries you would recommend? It is nice to meet you...I have been on this site for a while...due to aging parents my last year or so has been spent caring for them and now things have settled down that I have more time to devote to taking care of this place. Have a wonderful day!
 
ev kuhn
Posts: 55
Location: N-E edge of Atlanta
books food preservation forest garden
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Hi Virginia, Steve

I am in a similar situation and not far away in Duluth
have some raised beds, just started building a Hugelbed that shall serve double duty as oversized swale
just ordered some apple trees
and I, too, would love to get together with people who prefer veggies over lawn,
who would like to forage in their garden,
I would love to get together, help each other, share experience and seeds

 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
books food preservation urban
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Hi Virginia and ev:

It's a pleasure to meet you both. It sounds like we all may be gardening on about the same amount of land.

For years I was primarily interested in growing ornamental shrubs and perennials. But then decided something for the table would be nice, as well. So, I dug up about 1/4 of my backyard and created a dozen raised beds averaging 4 feet wide by 15 feet long. I garden on a slight incline and have terraced it in such a way that it captures rainwater as it flows downhill. The area doesn't receive full sun, so I started with leafy greens and root vegetables. Later, I experimented with heirloom tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants, with some success, and eventually added comfrey, asparagus and quite a few annual and perennial herbs. I started getting interested in food forests, and realized my setting is ideal for that type garden. So, I added a number of varieties of figs, blueberries, goumi berries, and a pawpaw (I need another one for cross-pollination). Then came the deer!

Unfortunately, my garden is not fenced, and within the last few years the deer have started patronizing the buffet on a regular basis. It's not uncommon for me to actually see 4 to 6 deer in my garden twice a week, and there is no telling how many come around at night while I'm asleep. Needless to say, I'm in the process of a "rethink". I've tried all the conventional and unconventional suggestions to ward off the marauders, but I'll tell you, suburban deer are fearless, and they can wreak havoc on a garden overnight. Some plants seem to be less attractive to them than others. I find they like to sample everything, but some they "eat" and some they "leave alone". That limits what I can grow, and it slows down my progress because any new plant I introduce, I have to wait and see if it gets eaten or left alone, and it's not uncommon for a plant to be left alone for a season or two and then viola; it's on the menu. Or it flowers and they love the flower and/or fruit but don't eat the plant. All this experimentation takes time and can be quite challenging.

An 8 foot fence may be my only reliable solution. So, eventually, I may have to corral the tasty bits at the "All Night Buffet". Last night I was confronted by an 8 point buck in my driveway on my way to the mailbox. He just looked at me, like, "What are you doing checking the mail this time of night, and why are you standing between me and the buffet?"

I'd love to hear more about what you guys are doing in your gardens. If I can't grow bok choy, at least I can be happy for those who can!
 
ev kuhn
Posts: 55
Location: N-E edge of Atlanta
books food preservation forest garden
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a lot of people do not understand, that 'Bambi' actually is a cussword, Steve
all summer long I had two resident bucks
until this year I did not know, that rabbits eat hot peppers, they rip off the fruit, take a bite, dislike,drop it and pick the next one
I do not mind sharing, but when one morning all apples still far from ripe were gone, I screamed in anger

this time of the year my garden does not look like much,
with all the rain we had lately
but you really made me curious
and so far I have not even tried to grow bok choy

 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
books food preservation urban
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Hi ev:

You're right, to serious gardeners, "Bambi" is a four-letter word. The names "Bunny" and "Alvin" are usually not spoken in mixed company either.

Not only do deer and rabbits exploit different levels in the garden (what they can reach standing on their hind legs), they seem to have different preferences when it comes to eating. Deer eat some things rabbits won't touch, and vice versa. They both have hearty appetites, however, and just like people, their individual tastes span the spectrum of cuisines. One year I decided about all I could grow was Pepperoncini peppers, onions and garlic because the previous 2 or 3 seasons I harvested more than the neighbors and I could eat. Not even the insects had a taste for them. So I planted enough for a Sicilian army. Then a rabbit (or family of rabbits) moved in with a taste for Italian, and that was that. Lessons learned: "Don't put all your eggs in one basket" and "Just when you think you've got it figured out..." That was the year I decided to fence the rabbits out. I guess it keeps things interesting, but if I had to depend on feeding my family with what I grow, we'd starve, or at least have very upset stomachs.

This time of year my garden looks abandoned. But, being a glutton for punishment, I will, in all likelihood, be at again before long. Among other things, "Alvin", "Bambi" and "Bunny" can teach us a lot about humility, and it's not in my nature to accept defeat. Especially by animals a rung or two down on the evolutionary ladder.

If you have a problem with deer getting to your prized vegetables, don't bother with bok choy. They'll just phone for house fried rice to eat along with it!
 
John Elliott
pollinator
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I've grown and harvested nice, big bok choy off of my hugelbeds, so I must be doing something right. In the 7 years I have been here, I have seen one deer that was on his way through and didn't have time to stop and nibble. Maybe since I live within earshot of the police training range, all the gunfire has them perpetually spooked. I guess that was fortunate on my part, for it is still far enough away that it doesn't spook me.

I occasionally see a rabbit, and the amount of nibbling he does is minimal. I suppose if at some point he breeds like a rabbit and I have many more around, then I will have to do something. My biggest problem is squirrels, with their infuriating habit of digging in a freshly seeded starter pot. I prepare garlic and hot pepper sprays when it gets too aggravating, but I don't keep up with it longer than I have to. If I spray for a few days, and there isn't a rain to wash it off, they usually get the hint and go back to nibbling on the other stuff that is out there.

I would suggest making some habanero and garlic soup and putting it in one of those hose attachment type sprayers. If that smell is reeking from a good part of your property (to the critters, not us, because humans have a poor sense of smell), then they should leave you alone.
 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
books food preservation urban
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Hi John:

I'm very happy you are able to grow and harvest bok choy. Where do you garden? Are you in the suburbs?

Consider yourself lucky that you only have squirrels to deal with. I used to think chipmunks, squirrels, and rabbits were the bane of my existence -- then several years ago the deer showed up! I've tried what you suggest as a deer repellent and many, many other things I've either read about or come up with on my own. Believe me when I tell you, suburban deer are fearless. They are used to the world of humans -- our presence, our voices, our scents, our children playing, our dogs barking, our cats meandering, our noisy power tools, our cars, traffic noise, sirens, etc. and it doesn't bother them in the least. I see them during the day and I see them at night, and I've never seen one get in a hurry. They sample every plant they walk past, and they devour what they like! I'm strongly convinced that fencing them out is the only reliable option.
 
John Elliott
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I am in the suburbs -- of Augusta.

Even though we are Georgia's second city, we are much smaller, and the deer have not become accustomed to humans all throughout their territory. Richmond county has not filled in all the way, and there are still plenty of places where deer can have a home range that is not bothered by humans. If your deer are that bold, then you are going to have to deter them via their taste buds -- what you can't fence, sprinkle liberally with cayenne pepper.
 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
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Hi John:

I appreciate your input. Augusta is a fine city, and I'm glad to hear the deer have not yet overrun the suburbs. I have friends in North Augusta that I visit from time to time. They live out in the country and have horses, dogs, chickens, and a beautiful garden. The deer there are still skittish and it doesn't take much to frighten them away. I recently acquired 83 acres in rural east Alabama and plan to start a hobby farm there someday. Until then, I will fence a small portion of my current garden to keep the tastiest veggies out of harms way.
 
Nick Fairburn
Posts: 13
Location: Atlanta Georgia
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Hello all,
My annual garden is in west end and have a small forest i look after in ben hill neighborhood that i try to use some permaculture principles. Not sure if Im allowed to say that as im not licensed or anything haha. Im eager to meet folks who like to grow food, I like to make cuttings every spring perhaps you have some easily propagated plants you'd let me take a snip off of this may or june? I have a bunch of last years stuff in pots i could trade or seeds in exchange for a few cuttings. Maybe we could get together and swap a few 'mater starts this spring or something. Im also available for a light group gardening project if anyone needs a hand for an hour, thats about as long as my baby lets me garden. Things I have for trade right now strawberry plants, walking onions, figs, mulberries, pomegranate, nopales, serviceberries, and some bamboos rooted in pots and dormant. Probably other stuff too. Anyway im keen on diversifying whats in my woods and home so lmk if we can butter each others bread, or if anybody wants help on something.
best,
R
 
ev kuhn
Posts: 55
Location: N-E edge of Atlanta
books food preservation forest garden
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Dear R,
great idea, I am all for getting together, share ideas, working hands and seeds or plants
I have not started any seed yet, will wait until early February
you beeing south of town are roughly 2 weeks 'ahead' of me, according to UGA's planting chart
right now I can only offer seed for all kinds of veggies, lot's of tomato and pepper varieties, beans, okra and pumkins

maybe we should try to come up with an Atlanta premie get together at a central location?
what do we have so far?
West End
Dunwoody
Duluth
Athens
Lake Allatoona


 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
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Hi R:

Welcome! It's a pleasure to meet you.

I like exchanging ideas, and I've got some cuttings and divisions I'm willing to share this spring.

Ev:

I like your idea of a central location to meet and exchange goods and ideas. Let's give that some serious thought.

Regards,

Steve
 
ev kuhn
Posts: 55
Location: N-E edge of Atlanta
books food preservation forest garden
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I invited more GA permies over, hope you don't mind

so far we have:
 
Steve Sulli
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Hi Ev:

I'm glad you invited more Georgia permies. I say, "The more, the merrier!" I look forward to meeting them all.
 
Virginia Ratliff
Posts: 43
Location: Bartow County GA
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I have seen sprinklers set up on "motion sensors" that work real well for deer...and cats...lol! Also, a small hot wire set at the appropriate height seems to do a pretty good job at deterring things from my garden.

I have started saving seed and doing a lot more cuttings than I ever have...am always interested in diversifying my stock and sharing! I am also one of those who has a yard in transition from ornamentals to food and medicinal.

I also have 7.5 acres in Fairmount, GA, Bartow county on Hwy. 411...my goal is get a fruit/produce stand up and running on that highway and to develop the acreage with permaculture principles. Any entrepreneurs have any ideas I have a pretty good starting foundation and am always willing to talk! I have also been thinking about an internet based CSA or a Metropolitan Buying Club? I am so fed up with going to the grocery store and am to the point I want to eat as locally grown as I can!

I am looking forward to meeting everyone! Have a wonderful day!
 
ev kuhn
Posts: 55
Location: N-E edge of Atlanta
books food preservation forest garden
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Virginia, do you read your pms?
did I say something that kept you from a reply?
if so I apologize
 
Bremen James
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Small farming in Rydal, GA, just outside of Cartersville.

We keep pigs, laying and meat chickens, and a half acre of vegetable gardens for now.

Last year we began experimenting with Actively Aerated Compost Tea and will begin implementing that regimen this season.

We are working on getting a new hoophouse up this week, to start seeds in soon.

I am very glad to see more folks from GA active on this forum, it was time to come out of the woodwork!

 
ev kuhn
Posts: 55
Location: N-E edge of Atlanta
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Welcome, James

the more the merrier, the more we can learn from each other
and help each other
sounds like you will be mostly on the teaching side,
I on the learning end

hope the weather warms up soon,
the prospect of icy rain keeps me close to home
but I am itching to get out and meet all these like minded souls
 
Virginia Ratliff
Posts: 43
Location: Bartow County GA
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Good morning, Ev! So sorry about my delay getting back...we had a family member pass away and I have had out of town guests and things are beginning to get back to normal...I did find your email this morning! I will respond today!

Welcome, Rydal! I know where that is! We have property just down the road from you! Nice to meet you Bremen!

I am also looking forward to spending this winter meeting like minded souls and visiting! I really do not have 3 heads...although, when I try to talk permaculture and food production to my "inner circle"...they look at me like I have 3 heads or I get "you grow our food and we'll eat it"...! I am to a point in my life that I have no more room for excuses! The older I get the more I realize we as humans are creatures of habit...and unless I do some serious upheaval in my habitat...my circumstances will never change! I am so fed up with being "tied" to the "grid" for all my needs! I have learned so much about our food production, chemical production and use, pharmaceuticals...well, I cannot with a clear conscious any longer promote or contribute to what is driven strictly by money! So, I have been making small changes for a couple years and am excited and eager to continue this change! I plan on this being a stellar year for change in my lifestyle! My goal is for stores such as Ingles and Walmart to become obsolete in my world! And, after the last two weeks of interaction with family and friends...it has become blatantly clear that I had better reach out and start interacting more intimately with other "holistic" souls...because we really are few! I was so overwhelmed with the "drugs"...pharmaceuticals prescribed by doctors and the complaining about whole grain bread...I was so overwhelmed! I want to have conversations about heirloom seeds, apple trees...homemade apple cider vinegar...free range eggs...herbs! There is just not a nice way to say this...I truly do not want to hear about the "wonder drug" that the doctor just prescribed for that autoimmune deficiency that keeps participation of daily life at a minimum and that this is the third or fourth "drug" that worked wonders at first also...as people sit around and consume soda and store bought cake! And, I promise you these are not "uneducated" people! It blows my mind at how "habit" based humans can be! Sorry for my soap box rant here...it has been pretty stressful...thanks everyone for "listening"!

I have two interesting hugelkultur beds...they are built with pine...last year they didn't get the attention they should have...but they are actually pretty awesome! I planted one in asparagus and blueberry...and one has been used as an experiment with annuals because of the pine. So far I have been very pleased with everything they produced! My goal this year is to get as many key hole spots laid out and the ducks pen ready by spring. That reminds me...Bremen and others if interested...if you are ever in need of wooden boxes such as those found in moving and storage company warehouses that they store furniture in and pallets, we have access to an almost unlimited supply. And, the ability to deliver...I am always willing to barter for physical labor! And, for anyone who wants to come visit...please understand this place is a construction site right now...half the roof is almost finished and one window has been replaced...my poor living room right now is bare plywood...and my husband is a hoarder...as long as chaos doesn't bother you, our home is always open to visitors! Hope everyone has a wonderful day!
 
ev kuhn
Posts: 55
Location: N-E edge of Atlanta
books food preservation forest garden
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my condolances, Virginia
on the family, too,
poor you
jes, I can relate to aces and pills-talk vs appletrees and seed
most women do not understand
that a load of shit can be so much more appealing than a free sample of the latest fashon perfume
and that some men - real men? - find workpants and boots much sexier than high heels and pre-ripped skinny jeans
as long as you keep the cafe comming I'll rant with you ;/
and I promise no soda and no store bought cake,
lot's of alternative ideas instead, like baking your cake with acorn and pumkin flour

thanks to the friendly weather my hugel is still under construction,
had I known how much material and sweat goes into it, I would have started a long time ago *sigh*

wooden boxes? am all ears
barter for labour? wonderful, other people pay to go to the gym, I own a pitch fork ... or two *smirk*
talk about apple trees? I have two more on order, they should arrive end of February














 
Virginia Ratliff
Posts: 43
Location: Bartow County GA
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Thank you, Ev...for the condolences...it is appreciated!

LOL...I am a tomboy at heart! My poor Mom! She is one of those short, almost perfectly formed "Barbie" dolls...and I am a tall lanky tomboy! She "tried" a time or two to keep up...in my childhood days...she ended up getting hurt every time! Only girl she had, too, poor woman! But, now I appreciate being able to "fit in" when "rubbing elbows" with others! I am not comfortable in a dress and heels...but I will fake it if needed! It does still drive her crazy that I drive a pick up truck and have rubber boots sticking out of the back window!

I want to learn to use acorn and pumpkin flour! I have been doing my pie crusts, etc. with Spelt flour and have been pleased with the outcome! I am so weirded out about Monsanto and the prevalence of GMO's and their garbage in our food system that one of my goals is to be completely GMO free this year! Animals included...finding rabbit food GMO free has become a challenge...may have to resort to blending my own!

If you look up some of my older posts...I have pics of my hugel being built...I am more than willing to help with yours...I installed mine alone and it took me two days just to do one! After this crazy Atlanta weather decides to give us a break...I will get out here and take some pictures of the pallets and boxes and post in here. They just carried about 50 of those wooden boxes to the landfill! These are not generally small boxes either...most of them are 5'x5'x7' tall...I have a shed made out of four of them put together! It is just awesome! I don't think they are light enough to be using for animal tractors...but with a little modification they make great storage and permanent buildings! Our goal is to use them for animal shelters when we start raising animals on our Fairmount property...access and water is still a challenge there! We have finally purchased the equipment needed to work on the access...then we can conquer water. The property has water on it...but it is an eclectic layout and needs some serious work! I cannot begin to express how thankful I am that I have started learning about permaculture and alternative healthy ways to produce food and just how profound a change within myself I find growing...changes such as realizing just how wasteful and brainwashed I am! I remember growing up and hearing that the only people who compost are nuts...and now I am researching everything I can to learn how to successfully compost...I appreciate being one of those nuts! I appreciate the "wholeness" I feel when working in the dirt...as the movie line goes...sort of..."it completes me"! I have two grand boys, 10 and 5...we dig a lot of worms and fish! And, thankfully my daughter is a tomboy like her Mom...she has chickens and gardens! I am rambling now...sorry! Everyone stay warm and dry this day!
 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
books food preservation urban
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Welcome Bremen. I look forward to hearing more from you, and meeting you in person someday.

Virginia, I'm sorry for your loss. I know how difficult it is to lose someone you love. I truly hope to meet you and your family someday. You seem like a woman of conviction, and I think I can learn a lot from you. I have many lovely friends, but like you, I'm reluctant to talk with most of them about things that truly interest me. They're polite enough, but its like I'm speaking a foreign language, and they quickly steer the conversation in other directions. It's funny how much we are creatures of habit, and how easily stuck in our ruts we become. I'm looking to branch out, meet new people, and put into practice the new things I learn about permaculture and sustainability. Although I'm a city boy and have a reluctant partner, I think I can implement some of the things I learn without rocking his world too much.

I have had the privilege of meeting Ev in person, and visiting her place. Let me tell you, she is a force to be reckoned with, to say the least. I believe we can all learn a lot from her. If you get an invitation to visit her place, by all means, take her up on it. You'll be very impressed with what one willful woman can do in a very short time!
 
ev kuhn
Posts: 55
Location: N-E edge of Atlanta
books food preservation forest garden
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Steve, dear, maybe we should dub you 'sweet talker'

guys, I am from an aera and area, where people would just come and visit,
even after the invention of the cell phone
nice people are always welcome here


 
Laura Johnson
Posts: 38
Location: Georgia, USA
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Steve and Ev
It was so nice to meet you two. And to be able to converse with people that know what I am talking about. No "hugle- what"? On one of the Emails,there was a link to this board. And here are more Georgia Permies! We must do tours and meet and swaps! We are not close together tho. Ev, you will have to put a little red flag down here in Fayette county now.
And I love the fact that everyone is a work in progress and under constuction. I have multiple unfinished projects.
 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
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Laura:

It was a pleasure meeting you, as well. Thank you so much for your hospitality. Lunch was delicious -- you're a fine cook! The tour of your garden was enlightening and motivating. I'm inspired by your worm bin and the way you germinate seeds outdoors in late winter. The information you provided about bees was fascinating. Also, our trip to the poultry show will stand out in my mind for a long time to come. Thank you for taxiing Ev and I. I enjoyed meeting your friend Barbara, as well. Like you, she's a lady on a mission. It's so nice to exchange ideas about our gardening passions and learn more about permaculture with such inspiring people. Thank you again. I had a great time, and look forward to getting together soon!
 
Nick Fairburn
Posts: 13
Location: Atlanta Georgia
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Hey folks,
On the 15th at 7ish the Georgia Perennial Association has an open to the public speaker, topic is Epimediums. I haven't played with these plants before but a shade loving, evergreen, deer resistant ground cover that flowers? Yes please haha. Anyways if anybody wants to meet up in the gardens for a bit before the speaker at 730 im down.
Info about the speaker:

March 15, 2016
McElreath Hall
Atlanta History Center

Karen Perkins
Garden Visions Epimediums, Templeton, Massachusetts

Epimediums — Jewels of the Shade


Known by many as a simple ground cover for dry woodland shade, Epimediums are finally getting the appreciation that they deserve. This "perfect shade perennial" possesses a delicate beauty that belies its surprisingly tough, long-lasting nature. Karen will illustrate the many and varied types now commercially available, including some of the exciting new evergreen species from China. Characteristics, growth habit, growing and propagation, pests and diseases, and combining Epimediums with other shade perennials in the garden will also be addressed. We will even get a glimpse into the collecting trips to China made by Darrell Probst.

Karen graduated from Cornell University with a B.S. in Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture and from the University of Delaware with a Master of Science in Public Garden Management. She has worked/interned at several botanic gardens including the Cornell Plantations, Longwood Gardens, the Arboretum at Flagstaff, Royal Botanic Gardens - Kew, England and Royal Botanic Gardens - Edinburgh, Scotland. She served in the Education Department of the Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston, MA for 17 years. Karen is currently the owner of Garden Visions Epimediums, a Massachusetts-based mail order nursery offering over 170 species and varieties of epimediums along with other choice companion shade perennials.
 
Virginia Ratliff
Posts: 43
Location: Bartow County GA
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Spring is finally here! Yes! Dear Ev and Steve...thank you for the wonderful visit today! I am so pleased to meet you both and cannot wait to visit your gardens! I am so looking forward to meeting others also! This place is a work in progress and a challenge...but a labor of love! I have no more shade excuse...trees and lots of perennials are on the list! My big goals for this spring...get the duck fence built...easy job! Move all those Azaleas from the middle of the yard to the edge and replace with dwarf trees and perennials, big job! I almost forgot...the two raised beds in the back yard, was all scavenged and the rabbits made the dirt...just sweat equity in both those! I love the idea, Ev, of using the smaller wooden boxes for planters! We need to talk! I think you and I can manage loading/unloading those by ourselves!

I am so looking forward to seeing your gardens! I already have several doable ideas thanks to your visit today! And, as you saw...I am in desperate need of some serious organizing but have plenty of material to scavenge through!
 
Steve Sulli
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Location: Atlanta, GA
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Hi Virginia:

Ev and I enjoyed our visit with you, as well. Thank you so much for taking time out of your busy day to give us a tour of your place. It was a pleasure learning more about you and I was touched by your willingness to share so much about yourself with us.

I'm impressed by your "rabbit tractor" and the way you use rabbits in your garden to improve the soil and give your plants a boost. Your plans for the chickens and ducks gave me food for thought, as well. Ev's idea of using those sturdy ready-made wooden boxes for planters is an excellent idea, and since you have an unlimited supply of them, there's no end to the number of ideas you can come up with to make good use of them. I really like the way you're using galvanized pipes, metal grates and shelving as trellises. I will definitely be incorporating some of your ideas in my garden.

Please come visit us when you have the time.

Again, thank you so much for a wonderful day!
 
Virginia Ratliff
Posts: 43
Location: Bartow County GA
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I should have put this post up weeks ago! I visited Ev's garden and I am very impressed! Such a beautiful piece of property! I say ducks will eventually fit nicely...the creek is great! Next visit I shouldn't have the boys...and I want to take pictures of your watering system! That will work perfectly for me out in Fairmount...I never thought about free standing water tanks put up high enough for gravity use...that solves most of my immediate watering issues for animals and plants! I brought home 10 more pallets yesterday! These are actually small enough I can move them by myself...lol...whenever you decide to tackle pallets, I am more than willing to help!

Steve...I am looking forward to visiting you next! I was so inspired by your and Ev's visit...I cleaned up the greenhouse and it is already almost full! The sides are still not up...lol...but I have a few months to get that done! All my herbs have come from seed...except the chocolate mint...and I am determined to add more perennial herbs to the annuals and finish that key hole garden at the back door! I have finished taxes...yeah! So, I will email you later this week and see what every one's schedule looks like...I am so looking forward to seeing your garden!

I am looking forward to meeting others also! I have had a very busy year and not replied here as I should...I would like to apologize for that. My reason for all these time gaps are two deaths in the immediate family...a stillborn grandson and a son in law. This has left some pretty big gaps around here...I hope everyone can stay patient with me. I have stayed productive though...I have added 4 ducks, 2 chickens, 2 apple trees, 2 raspberry bushes and filled my greenhouse! On top of all the traveling between GA and AL I have done for my daughter and 2 grandsons who just lost their dad. I am tired and very frazzled some days...but determined to stay on a forward track with transferring this yard into a food forest!

Hope every one has a wonderful day and looking forward to a very productive and rewarding summer!
 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
books food preservation urban
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Hi Virginia:

I'm glad Ev and I proved to be an inspiration. Ev's garden is phenomenal; mine, not so much, but I'm motivated, and working hard to get it the way I want it. For the last several weeks I've been involved with cleaning up my old garden and planning my new garden. Once I get the deer fence around my new garden I can then begin moving my existing raised beds to take advantage of a more sunny location closer to the house. Needless to say, it all takes time, and some days I'm more energetic than others. I'll be pleasantly surprised if I get it all done by mid summer.

I'm always interested in meeting other gardeners and people with an interested in permaculture.

Take care and keep me posted.
 
Virginia Ratliff
Posts: 43
Location: Bartow County GA
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Thank you Ev and Steve for a wonderful visit yesterday! I see a lot of potential for your garden Steve! I must admit the deer fence is a must for you! There is nothing quite like working your fingers to the bone spending all day planting and then some animal come behind you and eat and/or dig up everything you just did! You have a beautiful piece of property and I cannot wait to see what you do with that garden plot and see the changes of the seasons play out in your yard!

I truly like the idea of a monthly schedule to meet and visit! I so enjoyed the Dunwoody gardens! More please! It is such a pleasure to be involved with you all! I think I found a farm in Powder Springs to go visit on my way home yesterday...let you know after more research! I did visit in Dec. of 14, several places up around Helen...Nora's Mill, Helen, GA was neat and I would like to visit Logan Turnpike Mill in Blairsville. I also visited Mercier Orchard and R & A Orchard...all their baked goods included "enriched flour" so I did not purchase anything...might be interesting to see if any change has come about thru the years? And, I would like to go back to the Mountain Valley Farm Store, Ellijay, GA...that was an extremely interesting place!

Looking forward to seeing you all very soon! Have a wonderful day!
 
Steve Sulli
Posts: 14
Location: Atlanta, GA
books food preservation urban
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Hi Virginia:

It was a pleasure seeing you yesterday, and giving you a tour of my garden. Also, I enjoyed showing you the Dunwoody Community Garden, as well, and I plan to visit it more frequently to watch their progress, and follow their experimentation.

This morning I will be outside pulling weeds, and transplanting and mulching herbs and perennials. Also, I plan to finish our little retaining wall this weekend, install the arbor I showed you, and flank it with two large ornamental cement containers. Where the arbor and containers are going doesn't receive full sun and has no fencing, so I'm still debating about what's best to plant there.

I'm glad you're on the lookout for farms and gardens for us to visit. We all seem to enjoy that, and personally, I learn a lot from observing what others do. Both Ev and I will find more places to visit in our respective areas of town, and you continue to do the same. Then, once a month we can all get together for a field trip.

I'm looking forward to seeing you soon.
 
Steve Lansing
Posts: 47
Location: Cumming, GA
forest garden hugelkultur trees
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hello Steve,

     Dunwoody and Dawsonville are not too far from each other. I am building a home and using permacultuer techniques on 7.5 acres. I would love to see your place and some of the ideas you have used. I have doing lots of development on my property with grading and construction. I have planted blue berries, black berries, peach trees, apple trees, fig tree and strawberries. I have even started using hugelkulter to dispose of all the trees and branches on the property and to hold water for future planting. I plan on swales and building a dam to make a bottom in a ravine between to slopes. Lots of plans, just not a lot of help. Eventually, I would like to have various classes on the property to expand the permaculture concepts. At the moment I am deployed, but upon my return, I hope to return working on the property. Drop a line and we can discuss permaculture concepts. All my best, Richard
 
G Christian Kalnay
Posts: 13
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I am so glad that these forums exist.

We (my wife and kids) just got to Buford / Sugar Hill (NE of Atlanta) and have been planning our move/escape from South Florida for more than 2 years. We've sold our home in So. FLA and are now re-located to a friend's house as we begin the search for the ideal property!

But more importantly, we would really like to meet and make friends with other Georgia permies, and see and learn from those in this area. 

If anyone is open to a meetup, visitors or would like an extra set of working hands on a project, please let me know!
 
Virginia Ratliff
Posts: 43
Location: Bartow County GA
2
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Welcome George! And, Family!

I agree, I love these forums! I spend a lot more time learning than participating...I feel like a "lurker" most of the time! I usually find multiple answers to any question I have...so, I just implement and experiment and combine until the result I am after is achieved! I learn so much here and look forward to being more active as I get experience and established!

I am always open to visitors and any help is always appreciated! You are always welcome here! I have actually met and just love Steve S. and Ev! We are supposed to be doing a once a month get together...life seems to constantly get in the way! As embarrassed as I am to admit this, I have been meaning to strike up a conversation with Laura...for almost 2 years now...I have been wanting to visit her...another one of those that life seems to be constantly in the way!

I am glad this thread was bumped up...any more "lurkers" around like me? I would like to meet!
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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