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Juglone tolerance of less common trees.

 
pollinator
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The charts on juglone tolerance that I've found don't mention seaberries, autumn berries, honey berries, and medlars. Does anyone know if they have any tolerance?
 
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Juglone testing is fairly limited in scope so far most universities that have conduced studies have not run the gamut of plant types in their testing.
They have mostly stuck with wide spread flowers, berries and shrubs used by the landscaping community.
For specific plants, such as you have listed, it would be wise to do a single plant experiment first to see if there is any indication of effect.
 
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Hey Ken! Did you ever find out if it's okay to plant Medlars or honey berries in juglone containing soil? I just cut down several young(ish) black walnuts in an area and have 10 medlars and 20 honey berries I want to plant there....
 
Ken W Wilson
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Hi Monica.  I didn’t find anything on seaberries, honeyberries, or medlars.

I found one reference that autumn berries are tolerant. They tolerate pecans very well, but aren’t near my walnut.

I kept the seaberries and honey berries away from juglone. They never grew due to some unknown reason. Not sure if it might be soil pH, soil type, climate or what. Autumnberries grow good here but got frosted three years in a row.

My medlars aren’t exposed to juglone. They are related to apples and apples aren’t tolerant. Medlars could be, but I don’t have anything else to go by. If the walnuts weren’t very big, you might be OK anyway. If you have any other options for planting the trees. I’d probably just try two medlars first. My grafted trees are small, attractive trees with really nice, big, white blooms

Do you have any mature medlars? Have you cooked with any? I don’t like them raw. I’m going to try making a jam or butter out of them. I need to search for recipes.


 
pollinator
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The walnut family is okay with at least the following families based on what I have seen:
Mint family
Mulberry-Fig family
Pawpaw
Persimmon
Honeyberry family
Carrot family
Squash family
Sweet Potatoes family
Grass/corn family
Spinach Family
EDIT Rose ( Blackberry sub-family, Prunus sub family, Apple-Medlar-Pear sub family and the rest)
While I have personally seen wild blackberries/raspberry, rose brambles, cherries, peaches and crabapples by Juglans, the prevailing wisdom is stating that while it does happen, it is not an optimal setup, so the rose family should not be on the friendly list
After looking at quite a few list I am seeing that I am seeing that some of the nightshade family is a yes but others are a no, some of the legumes is a yes others are listed as tolerant, some of the rose family is a yes, others say apple is a no.


EDIT: Alder and legume seems to be on its stay away list so I figure that the other nitrogen fixing family is too (seaberry/autumn olive/goumi)
While I have not personally seen legumes family or alder or autumn olive family by walnuts, the prevailing wisdom seems to be that seaberry/autumn olive family is great, legumes are tolerant of it and Alder is no where to be seen
 
Ken W Wilson
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The University Of Wisconsin has apple on their intolerant list. I have found other contradictions in the lists from different sources.  I guess it isn’t an exact science.
 
S Bengi
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Gaias Garden A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture, walnut guild 2nd Edition Toby Hemenway

It consists of:

Walnut – English or Black Walnut (Juglans spp.) – for nuts
Hackberry – food for wildlife
Wolfberry – food for wildlife and medicine
Peppers or tomatoes
Elaeagnus (Elaeagnus spp.)
Mulberry – for fruit or fodder
Currants – for fruit
Elderberry – for very edible flowers and fruit


 
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