Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

What can I do with chestnuts

 
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am just about to purchase a old chest nut farm it has 26 producing trees scattered over 12 acres. My dream is to turn it into a eco friendly clamping retreat with a few acres of food and permaculture based lifestyle for people to come and enjoy , learn and hopefully make them think a little more.
And suggestions on what to do with chestnuts? I even considered running pigs underneath routes to get the beautiful buttery flavour through them....
 
pollinator
Posts: 991
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
67
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm sure hogs and maybe turkey's would do well on them. They might have more value as people food though. If there are other chestnut farms in the area, you might find a grower who will harvest them on shares. They do that with pecans here. No chestnuts here except the tiny trees in my yard.
 
Christian Power
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for the recipes that's most appreciated.
Thank you as well for the suggestion of selling to another farmer.
The problem with chestnuts is the literal painful harvesting process is labour intensive and the market has dropped considerably in Australia. I am exploring flour options and dukka and will Perdue these further.
The beauty of running pigs is that the hardwork will be done by the pigs(I think) and I will be left with husks.... These aredry and brittle spiky things which I believe will take some time to break down.. I was thinking of investing in a heavy duty chipper to chew these up for mulching. Thoughts? And if I slash the leaves once there fallen is this a better start for mulch?
Cheers
 
Tyler Ludens
master pollinator
Posts: 11359
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
738
cat forest garden fish trees chicken fiber arts wood heat greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You might also chip or roughy grind the whole nuts in their husks and feed them to chickens, who will pick out the nutmeats. But pigs seem like they'll do all the work for you.

Here's an article I found about pigs on chestnuts: http://www.mast-producing-trees.org/2009/11/chestnut-finished-pork/
 
Christian Power
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Love the article thank you....
So I think until I find a viable market for chestnuts I will run pigs to eat the nuts the at the end of the season run the slasher over the whole lot chopping the nuts to help them mulch easier into the ground...
 
Posts: 175
14
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
what you can do with chestnuts is a lot. at our farm, we've roasted them for folks, ground them into flour and made cookies, cakes, and breads. We've also dehydrated them whole and added to soups. Of course, you can let animals eat them, but they are way too valuable to me to do that with. I suggest experimenting with as many ways to prepare chestnuts as you can. There is a tremendous market for gluten free foods right now. The flour is pretty easy to make, I use a regular corn grinder. I shell them after drying them by crushing them in a dave-bilt nutcracker.
I don't find the harvest to be painful, I either stomp on the burs with boots or pick the nuts out wearing leather gloves. I can harvest about 20 lbs/hr by hand, I find it to be well worth the time.
 
Skool. Stay in. Smartness. Tiny ad:
dry stack retaining wall
https://permies.com/t/85178/dry-stack-retaining-wall
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!