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permaculture solution to chicken-eating dogs

 
paul wheaton
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You don't have too many slugs - you have a deficiency of ducks!

 
paul wheaton
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Chicken eating dogs: I hope nobody thinks I am saying that there are chickens that eat dogs. This is about dogs that eat chickens.
 
jimmy gallop
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notice the hood emblem
my chickens would eat a dog if given the chance
In America they would probably charge him with animal cruelty,they both being considered pets.
all though they do allow sled dogs and pack dogs hog dogs hunting dogs search and rescue ......
 
Dan Boone
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The phrase "chicken eating dogs" really cries out for a hyphen in this context, so I put one in your thread title: "chicken-eating dogs". Hope that's OK.
 
Cassie Langstraat
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hahahahahahaha, i love the guys face.. just like this is a normal day on just a typical form of transportation for him hahahaha
 
John Thames
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I have a yellow lab that has killer instincts. He's never been trained to hunt but will bring me prairie dogs and sage grouse so needless to say I can't keep him away from the chickens. I'm constantly having to tell at him and occasionally use "corrective stimulation". But he keeps going after them. Other than keeping him or the chickens in their respective pens I haven't found a good solution yet.
 
Heather Davis
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So my dog caught a chicken the first time he met one and my friend (owner of said chicken) said to tie it around the dog's neck and leave it there for a few days. She said it would cure him. Well, we didn't have a few days, but my friend rubbed the dead chicken in my dog's face and my dog avoided my friend for the rest of the visit. I wouldn't trust the dog around chickens, but he might have been cured if he had the dead chicken around his neck for a few days.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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my friend (owner of said chicken) said to tie it around the dog's neck and leave it there for a few days. She said it would cure him.

I have also heard of the dead chicken around the dog's neck idea up in Canada.

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I hope nobody thinks I am saying that there are chickens that eat dogs.

Well, they are omnivorous scavengers; given the chance... small enough dog, big enough group of chickens...

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As for the original film. Wow. Awesome. I want one! Just can't imagine what I'd do with the critters after I pulled up to work, BUT... ...might be a great gimmick to pull up the the farmers market with a few dogs rigged with a chicken like that, pulling me and a cart of veg!

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notice the hood emblem

Yeah, that was great! I used to have one on the back of my bike courier helmet back in the day. Mine was smaller, this was obviously off of a big truck by the same company.

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hahahahahahaha, i love the guys face.. just like this is a normal day on just a typical form of transportation for him hahahaha

I actually think that this might be a normal day thing for this trio. The set up does not look like a one-off; it was clearly constructed with a lot of thought, and the chicken does not at all look distressed. The dog is trotting along well, in spite of having a bar between front and hind legs.

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jacque greenleaf
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Yeah, that chicken is totally blasé - which I think is the funniest part!
 
Bryant RedHawk
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the best cure I've ever used or seen is the tie the dead chicken around the neck of the offending dog and leave it there. Works a treat every time, the dog will even avoid them after the experience.
 
Jeanne Wallace
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Location: Cache Valley, Northern Utah (zone 6a, 4,900 elevation)
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Individual dogs have very different personalities and temperaments. A good dog breeder will conduct "puppy temperament testing" when the pups are between 6-8 wks of age. A good place to start with civil fowl behavior in your canine is to begin with a dog that has low prey drive, and then to train the dog to the behavior you expect. In my experience, a dog with high prey drive is very unlikely to be able to be "trained" to NOT chase after and kill/eat chickens. But a dog with low prey drive can be trained to interact well with poultry and rabbits.

I raise ducks and rabbits. My Shiloh Shepherd, Bella, now 6 yrs old and 117 lbs, was selected as a puppy because she had the lowest prey drive of her litter. Bella is very well trained, and treats the ducks and rabbits as members of the family, even watches over them protectively. I raise the ducklings IN THE HOUSE (in a bathtub adjacent to the room that has her dog bed), so she comes to think of them as Members of the Family. I supervise her time with them, and make sure she gets daily visits with the ducklings. Later, I put the dog in a down stay (which she will maintain until I give the "release" command) and let the ducks explore around her. Again, this needs to be well supervised.

Since ducks can be "herded", and she is a herding type dog, I give her the "job" of protecting and herding the ducks as they are moved daily from the Hoop Coop to their paddocks and back in the evening. Our first forays into dog-herding-ducks were done with Bella on leash until she got the hang of moving slowly enough not to startle them. The paddock consists of temporary fencing (ducks can generally be kept in with a fence as low as 2-3', ours is 4'--which Bella could easily jump, but she has never tried to get into the duck paddock). She takes her job of protecting them seriously, and seems to derive great pleasure watching their antics. This fall, when the weather first turned chilly, the ducks ran flapping their wings right at Bella and flew a few feet right over her head: she didn't twitch a muscle and just sat there watching them, grinning (I think she was proud of herself). I always jackpot treat her (lots of positive reinforcement) when she displays good behavior toward the ducks and rabbits, but never give negative punishment, which would merely serve to break her trust/confidence in me.

In sum, begin with a dog that has tested low prey drive, and train thoroughly. If you raise the ducklings/chicks in the house, your dog should come to think of them as members of the family/pack. A dog so trained will bark if a predator comes too close, and may chase the predator away.

If you already have a dog with high prey drive, a MUZZLE is in order! Along with an excellent fence, lots of training and constant supervision.
 
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