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Water Release from sloughed off tree roots due to cut tops?

 
Posts: 947
Location: Graham, Washington [Zone 7b, 47.041 Latitude] 41inches average annual rainfall, cool summer drought
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I recall being taught *somewhere* that when a tree is cut while it's not dormant, it kills off much of its roots and in so doing releases the water contained in those roots. Enough that cutting down a stand of poplars will often make ground boggy for a few days regardless whether or not there's been rain for the past few weeks.

But when I try to confirm these memories via google, my search-fu is failing hard.

Can anybody confirm whether or not this is true [and if it is true, can you provide links supporting it?]
 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
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forest garden urban
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I've gotta go to work, so I don't have time to look for it now. But on youtube there is a video of a group of tree fellers getting a large oak off the top of house. As they're removing top growth to lighten the tree enough to use a crane, water starts pouring out of the trunk of the tree. Freaked the newer tree trimmers out, but think it supports your theory.
 
Casie Becker
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Shortly after the 18 minute mark in this videa
 
master pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Wild!

I thought it might be a hollow tree filled with rainwater (we call those "Magic Trees" on our place because frogs and other critters live in them), but I guess not!
 
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