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glorious spring day  RSS feed

 
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Had the most wonderful weather today. Got to dig in the garden all afternoon. Planted pea seeds for snacking, then spur of the moment decided I needed a landrace soup pea, so I planted the beginning of that too. Super stoked about spring. Can't wait to find out what I'll plant in the garden tomorrow.

What really got me excited was discovering that I finally reached the 1 foot mark on my garden soil, with the roots of some weeds growing into the hardpan. This is the start of year three working my Victory Garden. When I first started, it had half an inch of depleted sandy dust that wouldn't even grow weeds. Now it's the most verdant part of the property.

I call this my Victory Garden because I work it like my great grandparents (and their parents, and grandparents... ad infinitum) worked the land during the first world war (and before). All the compost and excess organic matter is trenched. The soil is never left bare. If there is nothing to plant there, I just let the weeds grow so that the soil doesn't blow/erode away. Everything put into the soil is from the farm, most of which grown in the garden itself. I'm so pleased with it. All organic, the only outside soil modification is a light amount of manure (from the hens), ash from the woodstove and water from the well. My great grandparents trenched their night soil as well, but modern laws forbid it if I want to sell the produce.

Now, to rummage through my seeds and discover what I am planting tomorrow. Something green I think. Maybe I'll risk starting some broccoli early. It looks like we are in for an early spring.
 
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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My spring is shaping up to be 2 to 3 weeks early...
 
gardener
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Location: Virginia (zone 7)
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Hope you (all) have a glorious Spring!


May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind be always at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face;
the rains fall soft upon your fields
and until we meet again,
may God hold you in the palm of His hand. (traditional gaelic blessing)



 
Posts: 6499
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Spring is early here also....seems like we've had spring like weather for half of the winter. I'm planting a few things but because we have been known to have a pretty hard freeze as late as the first week in April, I'm holding myself back....a little

and yes! to a glorious spring!

...that is a sweet gaelic blessing Karen
 
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Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
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Spring will probably be early here in Ladakh too, since the winter never got very cold, and it's already warming up a lot now. But snow or hard frost can happen as late as April.
 
raven ranson
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Another fantastic spring day.

Started digging a bed and found a dozen volunteer fruit trees. Replanted them in a place where they have room to grow and thrive... but they have to do it on their own. It will be complete and utter neglect where they are. Those who survive the summer drought can be grafted or budded with tasty varieties. Each tree got a big hole, about 50 times what they needed. I filled in about 3/4 of the hole with organic matter, then planted the trees on top. As the organic matter rots, they might sink down a bit, but we can fill in the hollow with mulch if it comes to that.

The trees are next to a small rock wall we are starting to build with field stone. The idea is that the rocks will hold the suns heat in the winter, and help capture dew in the summer. So far the dew part is correct.

The rest of the day spent hoeing my favas and spending time with sheep.

It feels absolutely glorious to have spring here again and to work the soil with my hands.
 
My first bit of advice is that if you are going to be a mime, you shouldn't talk. Even the tiny ad is nodding:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
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