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Temporarily Storing jerusalem artichoke and walking onions

 
dos zagone
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I received in the mail some jeruslim artichokes and egyption walking onions today but last frost is not till 4/4 in this area. So how can i temporary store them in the mean time. Thanks.
 
John Elliott
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Both tolerate the cold well, I would go ahead and plant them. When it warms up, they will be ready and take off.
 
Bill Erickson
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Depending upon where you are in the world and your weather at this point in the year, I'd put them in a cool, dark place in a cellar or basement. Keep them from freezing. If you have the space you could also put them under a pile of straw in the garden until it is time to plant.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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I agree with the sentiment of getting them into the garden as soon as possible, either planted now into their final destination, or stored in a temporary location. My Egyptian onions have already started growing for the season, even though the snow only melted a few days ago. About the only reason I wouldn't put the sunroots into the ground now is if you expect heavy predation by rodents. In that case, I'd wait to put them into the ground until the apple trees are flowering.

Sunroots are particularly susceptible to dehydration. If I need to hold them somewhere other than in the ground, I typically store them in plastic in a fridge, with some peat or coconut coir to absorb excess moisture.



 
dos zagone
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Thanks I planted half of each this morning and plan to plant the rest in a couple of weeks. Ill store them in a bin in the basement for that period.
 
Jennifer Smith
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Location: Zone 5
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So to those interested in the walking onions here is a small patch that has grown out of bounds. I just took photo today 5/7/16. I have plenty to plant and trade
20160507_172916.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160507_172916.jpg]
walking onions
 
Dan Boone
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Two weeks ago I found some Jerusalem artichokes in the bottom of my fridge with a 2014 harvest date on them. They survived a year and a half in a ziplock freezer bag and though some were moldy, I washed the contents of the bag in one of my garden tubs and threw out the obviously moldy ones, planting the rest. They are all pushing up half-inch-tall new growth now. So I am gonna go out on a limb and say they are pretty tolerant of refrigerator storage!
 
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