• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Bill Erickson
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Bryant RedHawk
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Dan Boone
  • Daron Williams

Plant ID  RSS feed

 
Posts: 152
Location: Connecticut
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Texture is similar to purslane. We are still in late winter in CT but this entire plant is bright green. I found in the garden where amaranth has been growing past couple of years. Interested in knowing what family this belongs to. Please see pic.
image.jpeg
[Thumbnail for image.jpeg]
 
Posts: 88
Location: Door County, WI
8
fungi goat hunting solar trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It could be purslane, but with depleted food stores in the leaf tissue, the inter- node length is diminished, and leaves grow closer together. If it has white sap, though, don't eat it- its probably spurge. Otherwise, it looks like purslane. Did you try eating a tiny bit to see if its got that sweet n sour purslane tang?
 
Ben Johansen
Posts: 88
Location: Door County, WI
8
fungi goat hunting solar trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ooh! Or it could be cleavers! I'd say try a tiny bit, and if it tastes really chlorophyll-y and green, it could be cleavers. If astringent and tart, purslane.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4339
Location: Anjou ,France
240
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks like clevers aka goose grass to me
Is it sticky to your clothes ?

David
 
Posts: 32
Location: South Central Oklahoma
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I agree - cleavers.
 
Posts: 70
Location: Coastal Southern California
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In my part of the world it's called bedstraw - a species of Galium.
 
When it is used for evil, then watch out! When it is used for good, then things are much nicer. Like this tiny ad:
Binge on 17 Seasons of Permaculture Design Monkeys!
http://permaculture-design-course.com
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!