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Reishi, Maitake and Chicken of the woods

 
Lee Gee
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Hi Peter,

3 years ago I got some fresh spruce and oak logs and got plugs and drilled, pounded and waxed over. I saw the spores growing on the ends of the logs. Last year a few measly Reishi and . . . . nothing out of the other 4 logs. We had a wicked Winter two and three Winters ago and I had left them outside. I thought they'd survive. Is there still hope? What shall I do to save them?

Also, I was thinking about getting grain impregnated spores and wanted to take advantage of my towns offering of free wood chips, boil 'em, mix it all up and lay down a bed and throw a tarp over it. The soil is hardpan clay and lots of oak and very shady in the summer. Wanted to improve the soil with my friends the mycelium and a blanket of fungi mixed wood chips. Since I have no control over the mix of wood chips, which species would do best under these conditions? Also, I am a bee keeper and I've seen my bees go for fungus in other apiaries, but I'm not sure what it was they were going for. Which species of fungi would bee best for boosting the immunity and health of my bees?

Thank you so much for joining us here and answering questions, and for all the good work you are doing with my friends the fungi.

Lee
 
Peter McCoy
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Hi Lee,
I would say the logs may still be alive. I would try soaking the logs for 24 hours when the temps are right and seeing if they respond. It may be that they need a water influx.

I would start a mushroom bed with King Stropharia, a go-to garden mushroom that is easy and forgiving to work with. I'd dig down a bed 4-6 inches, line it with burlap or punctured cardboard, and lasagna sawdust spawn, fresh hardwood chips, and top with straw to retain moisture. Do not use grains outside as it will attract pests and cause contamination.

Cheers
Peter
 
Tyler Ludens
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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If there are no hardwood chips or straw available, would additional cardboard work as well?

 
Peter McCoy
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No, it does not supply enough nutrients.
 
Lee Gee
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Hi Peter,

The logs are 5' and 4" - 6" in diameter. I had laid them down and kept the ground really moist on the north side of the house for the last two summers with no luck. I could put them in a tarp for a good soak. I'll have another go when it gets warmer.

Is King Stropharia the answer for boosting my honeybee's immunity? Have you noticed them seeking fungi in the forest? What could I make available for them either growing, tincture, infusion, whatever?

Thank you.

Peace and blessings,

Lee
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Thank you, Peter.

 
Peter McCoy
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The bee supporting fungi that Stamets is researching are primarily conks (hard woody mushrooms). Though bees have been known to feed on King Stropharia mycleium.

Peter
 
2017 Permaculture Design Course at Wheaton Labs
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