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Drought Fire Resistant Thorny barrier tree

 
Jackie lee
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Location: Western Australia
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Hello
I am wondering if anyone can suggest a thorny barrier tree or plant that is both fire resistant and drought tolerant?

Thank you kindly
 
Jamie Davis
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Autumn olive seems to have the traits you were looking for (fire, thorns, drought) , plus
1) edible berries
2) nitrogen fixer
3) classified as severe threat invasive in some states so be advised
 
Todd Parr
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Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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Autumn Olives, at least here, don't have thorns. Their cousin, the Russian Olives do.

I believe Osage Orange also fits the bill.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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besides the one already offered up by Todd, Acacia is probably the thorniest on the planet. I know it is used to deter Lions in Africa, was most likely the plant the Nazarene wore on his head at Golgotha.
If your local Autumn Olive trees have thorns, that would be good choice. Osage Orange is well known in the USA as a great Hedge tree.
 
Jamie Davis
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the osage is a good choice, the "fruit" has properties that repel bugs, not edible.

Hawthorne and honey locust are other options to consider.
 
Cristo Balete
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Elaeagnus Silverberry has big thorns, is fire resistant, drought tolerant and is a thick, dense barrier for privacy. I haven't watered mine in years, but I do keep them trimmed, and the leaves make great compost.
 
Jackie lee
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Location: Western Australia
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Ghankyou so much for all you fast responses.
Osage is deciduous, Itgorney acacia is a banned weed, honey locust is deciduous, olives mentioned are also a weed here in Western Australia.

So, really I'm looking for;
- thorns
- evergreen
- height to at least 3.5m
- available in Western Australia
- fire retardant
- drought tolerant
- fast growinggy
- easily propergstable from cuttings

Does such a plant exist...?

Thank you again I hope to contribute some to these forums as well if I can
 
Cristo Balete
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Location: In the woods, West Coast USA
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The Elaeagnus is easily 3.5M, evergreen, and should be available in Australia. Plant them about 1.5 M apart and they will get thick branches that also form a barrier, in addition to the thorns, and will easily grow from cuttings.
 
Jackie lee
Posts: 7
Location: Western Australia
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Unfortunately, (or fortunately) Western Australia has stricter quarantine regulations compared with the rest of the Australia and it appears that Elaeagnus is restricted.
 
Shawn Jadrnicek
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Location: South Carolina
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These aren't trees but they may work: Yucca sp. (edible flowers), Agave, Opuntia sp. (I think some Opuntia are terrible invasives in Australia so be careful)
 
Jackie lee
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Location: Western Australia
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Just wanted to say Thankyou again for the helpful suggestions. We are going to get some Coral Trees and hedge them. They're super spiny. Semi deciduous, so we'll plant a second row In front to make a heavier blockout.
 
Stephen Gibberd
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What is the scientific name of the coral trees you decided to make a living fence from?
 
Jackie lee
Posts: 7
Location: Western Australia
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Hi Stephen the scientific name is Erythrina.
You can also grow from giant branches.
However, I've decided to plant some Kei apples also and see how they go.
 
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