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Questions about Batch Box Rocket Stoves  RSS feed

 
Sheila Payne
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I hope I am not asking redundant questions, but I've been literally online all day trying to find the right heating method for my new home, and I just can't do it any more. hopefully you all can help me, and thank you
We found some land and I am trying to make this home as self sustainable as possible. I love the idea of a masonry heater, but cant afford it. Then I found out about rocket stoves, but insurance won't cover them. So then I saw that one can sort of do a hybrid between the two and it is the batch box, if I am understanding correctly. I could just do a wood stove, but I don't like the smoke aspect and all the ash etc... and the creosote.

The questions I have are, when I have my builder build our house, I was going to have him put in a chimney. Can this batch box connect to that, or is there something special I need the mason to do when he is building the chimney? And our house will be 1650 square feet cape cod style home. the downstairs will be 896 square feet and the upstairs is less because of the way the house is designed, there is less usable space. Would a batch box effectively heat this size home? And the third question is, when having the home built, what kinds of structural supports do I need to have put in to have this device on the main floor of the home (if I choose to go with the batch box)? The chimney will be in the center of the house.
 
Peter van den Berg
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Location: +52° 1' 47.40", +4° 22' 57.80"
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A batch box rocket can connect to a normal chimney, preferably just above floor level.
The best chimney is in the middle of the house, straight up, smooth and circular inside, insulated and ending 2 or 3 ft above the highest point of the roof. The chimney diameter should be at least the same as the planned riser diameter, larger isn't a problem.

An open plan house is ideal for a mass heater. I don't know the location of that admirable house and what the winters are like. But I assume you'll have lots of insulation in there, much more than is usual in the US. I guess you need a large batch box rocket core in there, say an 8" diameter riser. Under and around the spot of the heater in the house there should be an inflammable floor and structural support for about 4 tons.

Maybe a design sized similar to the one featured on the batchrocket resource site, http://batchrocket.eu/en/applications#culdesac ? Or maybe even bigger?
 
William Bronson
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I don't think a batch box rocket will necessarily be anymore insurance friendly than a J tube rocket.
In the USA insurance companies like mass produced products with underwriter testing or handmade masonry heaters created by specially certified craftsman.
 
Sheila Payne
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ughhh. I thought I read that people were getting away with them. How do people do it then? or is it only in other countries?

I am in Maine, so yes it gets cold for a long period of time. I really really would like a radiant heater of some sort, there's got to be a way to make it happen. Just those masonry heaters are so darn expensive! Are those even covered too?

As for the concept of my house, this is how it is planned out. http://www.jcalldesign.com/?pid=4&singleproduct=10#product=10
 
Sheila Payne
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What about the woodstove-rocket mass heater- hybrid idea? is there any benefit to it and would it bypass insurance?

 
Glenn Herbert
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I think that technically, this would not meet code either because it is installed in a way that is different from standard. But it does feature a manufactured central element which might make a code official more comfortable in granting a variance. It really depends on the officials in your particular location and how knowledgeable, comfortable and helpful they are.
 
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