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Spots on tomato plants, can you help identify?

 
Jordy Lakiere
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Hello everyone. Brand new to this site and very new to gardening in general. I'm trying to grow a bunch of stuff for the first time.

I started to notice all kinds of spots on my tomatos though. There are cherry tomatos and normal ones. I took some pics:

They all seem different. White spots and holes on the tips of leaves. Small black dots with yellow circles (blight?) Bigger black discoloration, and a lighter less spotty black stain.
I dont know what these are, searching on the net only gave me some hints but no definitive answer.

What are they if you know, and more importantly, how should I proceed? They appear mostly on the bottom leaves but some of the top leaves are not safe either it seems. My plants are young and get plenty of air circulation. It's been really cold/wet the last week though compared to what the weather should be


Thank you very much in advance!






 
Mike Turner
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Location: Upstate SC
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Septoria leaf spot, which spreads most rapidly under wet, cool conditions. Its spores get splashed onto the lower leaves from the ground and then work their way from leaf to leaf up the plant. Whatever you can do to improve air circulation and keep the leaves dry will help to slow the spread of the fungus.
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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...and keep the leaves dry will help...

Yes. When you water, water the soil, not the plant.
Some mulch under the plant (but not touching the stem) will help reduce splatter back from both rain, and watering. You do not want the soil bouncing up onto the plant.

 
Jordy Lakiere
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So all pics are the same problem?

I do water at the bottom and try to keep the leaves dry as much as I can. Anything I can do after it has set in, or will it stop spreading if I keep it dry?
 
Karen Donnachaidh
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It starts on the bottom leaves and moves up. With clean scissors, cut off all leaves with spots if you can. Doesn't hurt to wipe your scissors between cuts too. Those lower branches are not of much use shading the fruit anyway and usually drop off early (in my experience) so "Off with their heads!"
Mulch around the base to keep the rain from splashing dirt on the lower leaves and when you water them just water around them, not on them.
 
Freya Bennett
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Well, the only natural solution in this case would be to change microclimate in the greenhouse. Perhaps less water will help.
 
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