• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Stacie Kim
  • Jay Angler

I think this a type of elderberry?

 
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all, Ive had this plant for several years and it keeps spreading. Its in my back yard and I really like it. When I try to identify it as a elder the only thing that gets me is the amount of leaves a stem has compared to what google says it should have. Can someone help with identification? I also have wild poke but i try to keep it all dug up. I'm in south central PA.
IMG_20160802_153057108-1-.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20160802_153057108-1-.jpg]
IMG_20160802_153103519_TOP-1-.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20160802_153103519_TOP-1-.jpg]
 
gardener
Posts: 842
Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
56
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


hi wire,

welcome to permies


I would try looking up Sumac species

http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=24258

there are several types found in Pa
 
wade reed
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is not the poisonous kind correct? Ive been in these bushes, well they look like trees now and haven't got a reaction from touching them and I'm really sensitive to poison ivy.
 
Posts: 947
Location: Graham, Washington [Zone 7b, 47.041 Latitude] 41inches average annual rainfall, cool summer drought
53
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Poison Sumac grows white berries, the two red types I'm familiar with are Staghorn Sumac and Smooth Sumac, both of which are actually semi-edible [with the acid from the surface of the berries used to flavor a pseudo-lemonade of sorts] to those who don't have an allergy to the plants.

Same family as Poison Sumac, Poison Oak, Poison Ivy and Cashew.
 
wade reed
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kyrt Ryder wrote:Poison Sumac grows white berries, the two red types I'm familiar with are Staghorn Sumac and Smooth Sumac, both of which are actually semi-edible [with the acid from the surface of the berries used to flavor a pseudo-lemonade of sorts] to those who don't have an allergy to the plants.

Same family as Poison Sumac, Poison Oak, Poison Ivy and Cashew.



Thanks Kyrt. I'm glad I found out because this is really growing in my "back 40". Learn something new everyday as I was thinking elderberry. I knew something didn't add up though as there where to many leaves. Excuse my ignorance and Thanks a lot.
gift
 
Rocket Mass Heater podcast gob
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic