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I think this a type of elderberry?

 
wade reed
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Hi all, Ive had this plant for several years and it keeps spreading. Its in my back yard and I really like it. When I try to identify it as a elder the only thing that gets me is the amount of leaves a stem has compared to what google says it should have. Can someone help with identification? I also have wild poke but i try to keep it all dug up. I'm in south central PA.
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duane hennon
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Location: western pennsylvania zone 5/a
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hi wire,

welcome to permies


I would try looking up Sumac species

http://www.wildflower.org/gallery/result.php?id_image=24258

there are several types found in Pa
 
wade reed
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This is not the poisonous kind correct? Ive been in these bushes, well they look like trees now and haven't got a reaction from touching them and I'm really sensitive to poison ivy.
 
Kyrt Ryder
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Location: Graham, Washington [Zone 7b, 47.041 Latitude] 41inches average annual rainfall, cool summer drought
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Poison Sumac grows white berries, the two red types I'm familiar with are Staghorn Sumac and Smooth Sumac, both of which are actually semi-edible [with the acid from the surface of the berries used to flavor a pseudo-lemonade of sorts] to those who don't have an allergy to the plants.

Same family as Poison Sumac, Poison Oak, Poison Ivy and Cashew.
 
wade reed
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Kyrt Ryder wrote:Poison Sumac grows white berries, the two red types I'm familiar with are Staghorn Sumac and Smooth Sumac, both of which are actually semi-edible [with the acid from the surface of the berries used to flavor a pseudo-lemonade of sorts] to those who don't have an allergy to the plants.

Same family as Poison Sumac, Poison Oak, Poison Ivy and Cashew.


Thanks Kyrt. I'm glad I found out because this is really growing in my "back 40". Learn something new everyday as I was thinking elderberry. I knew something didn't add up though as there where to many leaves. Excuse my ignorance and Thanks a lot.
 
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