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useful privacy hedge

 
Posts: 19
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I'm in coastal oregon.. outside of the salt spray zone. I want to grow a privacy hedge under some large western cedars. I would like something that does not loose it's foliage in the winter. The spot gets good sun in the summer, but I think the house may block come sun in the winter.
I'm thinking of building a stone raised bed to plant the hedges in.
I don't know what kind to pick. I would like something with dual purpose.. something that either makes people or chicken food.
Any ideas??
 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
257
2
forest garden urban
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Do a search for fedges and you will get a lot of suggestions for edible hedge plants.

I don't know if they're all feasible in your location, but I've got pineapple guava, pomegranate, rosemary and am planting a yaupon holly (only north american plant with good caffeine content, supposed to be a delicious tea). In my area these are all shrub sized (or small tree) evergreens that tolerate hedge style pruning. Actually, they also have all have prominent flowers that attract a variety of pollinators during different times and the yaupon has winter berries that the local birds love.
 
patrick mort
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pineapple guava sounds really neat I've never heard about it. I just looked it up. Sounds like it's good down to 10 degrees. It should do ok here. Do you know how fast it grows? Couldn't find anything about that.
 
Casie Becker
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
257
2
forest garden urban
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What I can find suggests they're typically quite slow growers. Many sites recommend them as container plants, which certainly supports that thought.

Mine were very small when I planted them and have tripled in size in the past year. But we've had an unusually nice year for growing new plants, they have a very sunny location, and young plants often have an early surge of growth that doesn't maintain itself.
 
Posts: 423
Location: Portlandish, Oregon
30
forest garden fungi foraging
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I would say huckleberry maybe.
 
patrick mort
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I definitely plan on planting huckleberry here but I don't think it will get tall enough to make a good privacy hedge. Am I wrong? When I've seen it in the wild it was always 3 or 4 feet
 
Posts: 525
Location: Northern Germany (Zone 8a)
25
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i d love to grow (somewhat cold-hardy) tea-plant. camelia sinensis something. there is a "sochi" variant that should be very hardy.

they are evergreen, have nice flowers and produce tea.

sadly, my seeds did not germinate
 
Posts: 233
Location: Western Massachusetts (USDA zone 5a, heating zone 5, 40"+)
10
urban
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I was looking into this for a colder climate (zone 5a) and tentatively identified the following candidates:

Mahonia / Oregon Grape
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/mahonia-shrubs-75513.html

Barberry (some are invasive)

Japanese Plum Yew
http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Cephalotaxus+harringtonia+drupacea

Chilean Guava (supposed to have delicious fruit)
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ugni+molinae

Oleaster / variegated silverberry
http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Elaeagnus+x+ebbingei

Evergreen huckleberry
http://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_vaov2.pdf

Salal
http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Gaultheria+shallon

Some general links:
http://www.wildernesscollege.com/evergreen-shrubs.html
https://deepgreenpermaculture.com/2015/10/28/the-case-for-edible-hedges/
 
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1816
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hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
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I second the evergreen huckleberry - Vaccinium ovatum!

Another good evergreen shrub is Arbutus unedo, strawberry bush or tree.

gift
 
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