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Canadian Seed Exchange 2016/17/18 and beyond  RSS feed

 
master steward
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Location: Left Coast Canada
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Any Canadians interested in a seed exchange this winter?



If so, list what you're searching for and what you have to share.
 
pollinator
Posts: 288
Location: 7b at 1050 feet, precipitation average 13 inches, irrigated, Okanagan Valley
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I think it's a great idea, but the only seeds I might have are mammoth sunflower seeds. (I hope to be have more seeds next year.)
 
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I'm very interested! We've been saving seed for a number of years now, both for ourselves and the local seed library (hosted in the actual library, very cool) so we probably have some stuff other people would be interested in. Tomatoes, herbs, squash, flowers, cucumbers, dry beans, et cetera. Some we've been growing for long enough that they've probably started to adapt to our Okanagan climate. We also live 20 minutes south of the Gellatly Nut Farm, home to a lot of fanciful nut breeding experiments (some of which were quite successful and were propagated all around North America). Being nuts, those are only available certain times of the year (i.e., when we go out for a family outing to the farm in October; already been this year, sorry). I'll try to post a list when I'm using an actual computer. And not trying to make breakfast for the kids
 
Posts: 33
Location: Petawawa, ON, Canada Zone 3A
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I'd be game for this as well.  I'll have to make a post later on everything we have though.  Off the top of my head:

3 types of Pickling cukes.
Daikon and cherry belle Radish
a few types of "surprise" squash (usually spaghetti/zuke/pumpkin cross)
chives
night scented tobacco
Mongolian giant sunflower
a smaller Red sunflower(saved from a hybrid it still has a bit of unstable results)
Mini pok choy
aunt mollie ground cherry
Amaranth x 2 (love lies bleeding and another)
3-5 tomato varieties
oregano
dwarf grey snap pea
calendula
zinnia
Giant mullien
6-10 pepper species

I know there are a bunch more... I'll post them later.

I'm located 2 hrs West of Ottawa so zone 3-4 ish
 
Posts: 640
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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I'm interested in seeds of berries, nuts, and fruit suitable for zone 3.

I'm organizing a permaculture perennial library where people deposit plant stock at a local permaculture site, where they are taken care of. As a person makes deposits, they get access to the other plants in the library for taking cuttings, seeds etc.

The idea is twofold. It helps a local permaculturist establish their own site by having the wider permaculture community provide important perennial plant species. Then at a later time, other permaculturists have access to naturalized genetic stock so they can establish their own site quickly and economically.



So examples of material I am looking for are:
Autumn Olive
Russian Olive
Black Locust (I know, it's zone 4 but it's too important not to give it a try in a microclimate)
Blue False Indigo
American Gensing

High Bush Cranberries
Gooseberries
Honeyberries
Lingonberries
Aronia / Chokeberries
Goji / Wolfberries
Mulberries
Black Currants
High Bush Blueberries

Hazelnuts / Hazelberts
Siberian Pine Nut
Black Walnut

American Black Elderberry
Cold Hardy Cherries
Cornelian Cherries

 
Paul d'Aoust
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Nick, this is a brilliant idea. Thanks for sharing it with us; I think I may steal it one day if I'm ever in a position to do so

Whereabouts are you located in Canada?

Here's some of what I can get for you. We're in zone 5/6, so it may take some time to naturalise to your climate.

Nick Kitchener wrote:Russian Olive
black locust
Blue False Indigo (I think -- it could be the other false indigo)
Gooseberries
Aronia / Chokeberries (offspring of 'Viking')
Goji / Wolfberries
Black Currants
Hazelnuts / Hazelberts (from Gellatly Nut Farm just up the road, one of North America's premier sources of hardy nut genetics)
Black Walnut (again from Gellatly)
American Black Elderberry



I also can find wolf willow (Elaeagnus commutata, which is native to North America, unlike Russian Olive) and buffaloberry.

Most of these will have to wait until the fall, of course. Please don't hesitate to remind me come September or October if I don't remember to contact you by then!
 
Nick Kitchener
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Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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Absolutely interested! I will remind you when the time comes.

I live at the northern tip of Lake Superior. Zone 3 boreal forest in the most part. Canadian shield bedrock close to the surface in many places, and lots of wetland / muskeg swamp. There is also a decent amount of traditional farming land too.
 
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Paul d'Aoust wrote:I'm very interested! We've been saving seed for a number of years now, both for ourselves and the local seed library (hosted in the actual library, very cool) so we probably have some stuff other people would be interested in. Tomatoes, herbs, squash, flowers, cucumbers, dry beans, et cetera. Some we've been growing for long enough that they've probably started to adapt to our Okanagan climate. We also live 20 minutes south of the Gellatly Nut Farm, home to a lot of fanciful nut breeding experiments (some of which were quite successful and were propagated all around North America). Being nuts, those are only available certain times of the year (i.e., when we go out for a family outing to the farm in October; already been this year, sorry). I'll try to post a list when I'm using an actual computer. And not trying to make breakfast for the kids


I am trying to figure out how to order nuts from Gellatly?
 
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